Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Study Finds Link Between Alzheimer's and Herpes

I had two forms of the virus as a kid; chicken pox and cold sores. Should I be taking these antiviral drugs as a precaution?

Study Finds Link Between Alzheimer's and Herpes

A new commentary by scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Edinburgh on a study by Taiwanese epidemiologists supports the viability of a potential way to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
When the Taiwanese authors looked at subjects who suffered severe herpes infection and who were treated aggressively with antiviral drugs, the relative risk of dementia was reduced by a factor of 10.
Manchester’s Professor Ruth Itzhaki and Edinburgh’s Professor Richard Lathe say the paper, by Tzeng et al. and published in Neurotherapeutics in February 2018, also shows that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) leads to an increased risk of developing the disease.
“This article and two others by different research groups in Taiwan provide the first population evidence for a causal link between herpes virus infection and Alzheimer’s disease, a hugely important finding,” said Itzhaki.
They publish a commentary in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease on the three articles, arguing that they provide the strongest evidence yet for a causal link between herpes infection and Alzheimer’s disease, backing 30 years of research by Itzhaki.
Itzhaki said: “I believe we are the first to realize the implications of these striking data on this devastating condition which principally affects the elderly. No effective treatments are yet available.
“Almost 30 million people worldwide suffer from it and sadly, this figure will rise as longevity increases.
“But we believe that these safe and easily available antivirals may have a strong part to play in combating the disease in these patients.
“It also raises the future possibility of preventing the disease by vaccination against the virus in infancy.
”Successful treatment by a specific drug, or successful vaccination against the putative microbe, are the only ways to prove that a microbe is the cause of a non- infectious human disease.”
Most Alzheimer’s disease researchers investigate its main characteristics — amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles; however, despite the vast amount of research, the causes of their formation are unknown.
HSV1 infects most humans in youth or later and remains lifelong in the body in dormant form within the peripheral nervous system.
From time to time the virus becomes activated and in some people it then causes visible damage in the form of cold sores.
The Taiwanese study identified 8,362 subjects aged 50 or more during the period January to December 2000 who were newly diagnosed with severe HSV infection.
The study group was compared to a control group of 25,086 people with no evidence of HSV infection.
The authors then monitored the development of dementia in these individuals over a follow-up period of 10 years between 2001 and 2010.
The risk of developing dementia in the HSV group was increased by a factor of 2.542. But, when the authors compared those among the HSV cohort who were treated with antiviral therapy versus those who did not receive it, there was a dramatic tenfold reduction in the later incidence of dementia over 10 years.
“I believe we are the first to realize the implications of these striking data on this devastating condition which principally affects the elderly. No effective treatments are yet available,” said Itzhaki.
Professor Richard Lathe added: “Not only is the magnitude of the antiviral effect remarkable, but also the fact that — despite the relatively brief duration and the timing of treatment — in most patients severely affected by HSV1 it appeared to prevent the long-term damage in brain that results in Alzheimer’s.
Itzhaki said: “It was as long ago as 1991 when we discovered that, in many elderly people infected with HSV1, the virus is present also in the brain, and then in 1997 that it confers a strong risk of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain of people who have a specific genetic factor.
“In 2009, we went on to show that HSV DNA is inside amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s patients’ brains.
“We suggested that the virus in brain is reactivated by certain events such as stress, immunosuppression, and infection/inflammation elsewhere.
“So we believe the cycle of HSV1 reactivation in the brain eventually causes Alzheimer’s in at least some patients.”
The study by Tzeng et al. investigated only people with severe HSV and cannot be generalized to healthy populations.
The paper, “Herpes Viruses and Senile Dementia: First Population Evidence for a Causal Link,” is published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
Source: University of Manchester

 

Even minor distress puts you at risk of chronic disease

You are under major distress from your doctor having nothing to get you 100% recovered. Your doctor won't have anything to counteract this distress either so you are completely fucking screwed. So your distress could increase your risk of cardiovascular and neurological disease.
https://www.mdlinx.com/internal-medicine/top-medical-news/article/2018/07/16/7528413/?
Healthline/Medical News Today | July 16, 2018
Dealing with anxiety, depression, and stress at intense levels for a long time can impact our long-term physical health. But what if we are exposed to low levels of psychological distress? Does it still jeopardize our well-being? According to a new study, the answer is "yes."
"Although the relationship between significant distress and the onset of arthritis, [chronic pulmonary obstructive disorder], cardiovascular disease, and diabetes is well established," says Professor Catharine Gale, from the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom, "there is a significant gap in knowledge regarding the link between lower and moderate levels of distress and the development of chronic conditions."
Alongside Kyle McLachlan, at the University of Edinburgh in the UK, Professor Gale conducted a study investigating whether exposure to low and moderate psychological distress—which includes symptoms of anxiety and depression—could increase the risk of developing a chronic disease.
The results, which have now been published in the Journal of Psychosomatic Research, indicate that we do not need to experience a lot of distress in order for our physical health to be endangered. A little distress will suffice, the authors warn.

Reducing distress may prevent disease onset

In the new study, the researchers analyzed relevant data collected from 16,485 adults for a period of 3 years. Professor Gale and McLachlan obtain this information using the UK Household Longitudinal Study, which gathers data regarding the health status, well-being, and living conditions—among other things—of UK citizens.
They looked specifically for links between psychological distress and the development of four chronic diseases: diabetes, arthritis, lung disease, and cardiovascular disease.
They also investigated whether any such association could be explained by modifiable factors, such as eating habits, exercise, or smoking, or by participants' socioeconomic status.
Professor Gale and McLachlan's study found that, despite the fact that they are not considered clinically significant, even low to moderate levels of experienced distress can heighten the risk for a chronic condition later in life.
"Our findings show that even low levels of distress, below the level usually considered clinically significant, appear to increase the risk of developing a chronic disease, so intervention to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression may help to prevent the onset of these illnesses for some people."
–Professor Catharine Gale
Compared with people who reported no symptoms of psychological distress, those who reported low distress levels were 57% more likely to develop arthritis.
Also, those experiencing moderate levels of distress were 72% more likely to develop this condition, and individuals reporting high distress levels were 110% more likely.
Similar associations were also found for cardiovascular disease and lung disease (specifically, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]).
In fact, people with low levels of distress were 46% more likely to develop cardiovascular problems, those with moderate levels had a 77% higher risk, and those exposed to high levels of distress had a 189% higher risk.
For lung disease, the risk did not rise in people reporting low distress levels, but it was heightened by 125% in those with moderate distress levels, and by 148% in people with high distress levels.
However, the researchers found no significant links between psychological distress and the development of diabetes.

'Considerable public health implications'

The researchers note that the new study's results could change the way in which public health policies consider risk factors for chronic diseases.
"These findings have considerable clinical and public health implications," explains Gale.

"Screening for distress," she explains, "may help to identify those at risk of developing arthritis, COPD, and cardiovascular disease, while interventions to improve distress may help to prevent and limit progression of disease, even for people with low levels of distress."

Distress is a potentially modifiable risk factor, so if the links found by this study are confirmed by further research, it could indicate a new pathway in terms of preventive strategies for chronic diseases.
Professor Cyrus Cooper, the director of the Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit at the UK Medical Research Council, believes that Professor Gale and McLachlan's findings have "the potential to have a major impact on the development and management of chronic diseases."
Dr. Iain Simpson, former president of the British Cardiovascular Society, states that "cardiovascular disease remains one of the major causes of death and disability," so "[the] knowledge that distress, even at low levels, is also a risk factor is an important finding, which could have significant clinical implications."
To read more, click here.

What Is Mental Strength and How To Get It

Because your doctor gave you no path towards 100% recovery you are going to need a lot of mental strength to deal with with your disabilities, loss of social connections and cognitive decline. You are on your own post stroke.
From the Best Brain Possible with Debbie Hampton.
https://www.thebestbrainpossible.com/what-is-mental-strength-and-how-to-get-it/


How To Get Mentally Strong

As in increasing your body’s strength, the key to getting mentally tough is dedication and repetition. You have to learn to work with your thoughts, manage your emotions, and behave productively despite the circumstances. Over time with regular practice, attention, and focus, your brain will actually physically rewire itself, through a process called neuroplasticity, so that stronger and healthier becomes the default. Increasing your mental strength is the key to reaching your greatest potential in life.
Taking a single bodypump class isn’t going to get you in shape. However, doing three per week for three months is going to make some major changes. Similarly, if you practice small changes every day for a while to build mental muscle, you will see positive results.
According to Morin’s article, 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do, here’s how you get there:

1. They Don’t Waste Time Feeling Sorry for Themselves

Mentally strong people don’t sit around feeling sorry about their circumstances or how others have treated them. Instead, they take responsibility for their role in life and understand that life isn’t always easy or fair.

2. They Don’t Give Away Their Power

They don’t allow others to control them, and they don’t give someone else power over them. They don’t say things like, “My boss makes me feel bad,” because they understand that they are in control over their own emotions and they have a choice in how they respond.

3. They Don’t Shy Away from Change

Mentally strong people don’t try to avoid change. Instead, they welcome positive change and are willing to be flexible. They understand that change is inevitable and believe in their abilities to adapt.

4. They Don’t Waste Energy on Things They Can’t Control

You won’t hear a mentally strong person complaining over lost luggage or traffic jams. Instead, they focus on what they can control in their lives. They recognize that sometimes, the only thing they can control is their attitude.

5. They Don’t Worry About Pleasing Everyone

Mentally strong people recognize that they don’t need to please everyone all the time. They’re not afraid to say no or speak up when necessary. They strive to be kind and fair, but can handle other people being upset if they didn’t make them happy.

6. They Don’t Fear Taking Calculated Risks

They don’t take reckless or foolish risks, but don’t mind taking calculated risks. Mentally strong people spend time weighing the risks and benefits before making a big decision, and they’re fully informed of the potential downsides before they take action.

7. They Don’t Dwell on the Past

Mentally strong people don’t waste time dwelling on the past and wishing things could be different. They acknowledge their past and can say what they’ve learned from it. However, they don’t constantly relive bad experiences or fantasize about the glory days. Instead, they live for the present and plan for the future.

8. They Don’t Make the Same Mistakes Over and Over

Mentally strong people accept responsibility for their behavior and learn from their past mistakes. As a result, they don’t keep repeating those mistakes over and over. Instead, they move on and make better decisions in the future.

9. They Don’t Resent Other People’s Success

Mentally strong people can appreciate and celebrate other people’s success in life. They don’t grow jealous or feel cheated when others surpass them. Instead, they recognize that success comes with hard work, and they are willing to work hard for their own chance at success.

10. They Don’t Give Up After the First Failure

Mentally strong people don’t view failure as a reason to give up. Instead, they use failure as an opportunity to grow and improve. They are willing to keep trying until they get it right.

11. They Don’t Fear Alone Time

Mentally strong people can tolerate being alone and don’t fear silence. They aren’t afraid to be alone with their thoughts and they can use downtime to be productive. They enjoy their own company and aren’t dependent on others for companionship and entertainment all the time but instead can be happy alone.

12. They Don’t Feel the World Owes Them Anything

Mentally strong people don’t feel entitled to things in life. They weren’t born with a mentality that others would take care of them or that the world must give them something. Instead, they look for opportunities based on their own merits.

13. They Don’t Expect Immediate Results

Whether they are working on improving their health or getting a new business off the ground, mentally strong people don’t expect immediate results. Instead, they apply their skills and time to the best of their ability and understand that real change takes time.