Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Robot-assisted post-stroke motion rehabilitation in upper extremities: a survey

But I guess NO protocols. So once again useless research for survivors.
https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ijdhd.ahead-of-print/ijdhd-2016-0035/ijdhd-2016-0035.xml
1 / Fazel Naghdy2 / Golshah Naghdy3 / Haiping Du3 / Catherine Todd4
1School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunication Engineering (SECTE), University of Wollongong, Australia
2Robotics and Intelligent Systems, SECTE, University of Wollongong, Australia
3SECTE, University of Wollongong, Australia
4SECTE, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, Australia
Citation Information: International Journal on Disability and Human Development. 20160035, ISSN (Online) 2191-0367, ISSN (Print) 2191-1231, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ijdhd-2016-0035, December 2016

Publication History

Received:
2016-07-14
Accepted:
2016-10-01
Published Online:
2016-12-09

Abstract

Recent neurological research indicates that the impaired motor skills of post-stroke patients can be enhanced and possibly restored through task-oriented repetitive training. This is due to neuroplasticity – the ability of the brain to change through adulthood. Various rehabilitation processes have been developed to take advantage of neuroplasticity to retrain neural pathways and restore or improve motor skills lost as a result of stroke or spinal cord injuries (SCI). Research in this area over the last few decades has resulted in a better understanding of the dynamics of rehabilitation in post-stroke patients and development of auxiliary devices and tools to induce repeated targeted body movements. With the growing number of stroke rehabilitation therapies, the application of robotics within the rehabilitation process has received much attention. As such, numerous mechanical and robot-assisted upper limb and hand function training devices have been proposed. A systematic review of robotic-assisted upper extremity (UE) motion rehabilitation therapies was carried out in this study. The strengths and limitations of each method and its effectiveness in arm and hand function recovery were evaluated. The study provides a comparative analysis of the latest developments and trends in this field, and assists in identifying research gaps and potential future work. (But I guess NO protocols. So once again useless research.)

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