Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

The Obesity Paradox in Stroke: Lower Mortality and Lower Risk of Readmission for Recurrent Stroke in Obese Stroke Patients

Bet your doctor puts you on a diet even with this research. 
http://wso.sagepub.com/content/10/1/99.full
  1. Klaus Kaae Andersen1
  2. Tom Skyhøj Olsen2,*
  1. 1 Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark
  2. 2 The Stroke Unit, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark
  1. * Correspondence: Tom Skyhøj Olsen, The Stroke Unit, Frederiksberg University Hospital, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark. E-mail: tso@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

Background Although associated with excess mortality and morbidity, obesity is associated with lower mortality after stroke. The association between obesity and risk of recurrent stroke is unclear.
Aims The study aims to investigate the association in stroke patients between body mass index and risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke.
Methods An administrative Danish quality-control registry designed to collect a predefined dataset on all hospitalized stroke patients in Denmark 2000–2010 includes 45 615 acute first-ever stroke patients with information on body mass index in 29 326. Data include age, gender, civil status, stroke severity, computed tomography, and cardiovascular risk factors. Patients were followed up to 9·8 years (median 2·6 years). We used Cox regression models to compare risk of death and readmission for recurrent stroke in the four body mass index groups: underweight (body mass index < 18·5), normal weight (body mass index 18·5–24·9), overweight (body mass index 25·0–29·9), obese (body mass index ⩾ 30·0).
Results Mean age 72·3 years, 48% women. Mean body mass index 23·0. Within follow-up, 7902 (26·9%) patients had died; 2437 (8·3%) were readmitted because of recurrent stroke. Mortality was significantly lower in overweight (hazard ratio 0·72; confidence interval 0·68–0·78) and obese (hazard ratio 0·80; confidence interval 0·73–0·88) patients while significantly higher in underweight patients (hazard ratio 1·66; confidence interval 1·49–1·84) compared with normal weight patients. Risk of readmission for recurrent stroke was significantly lower in obese than in normal weight patients (hazard ratio 0·84; confidence interval 0·72–0·92).
Conclusions Obesity was not only associated with reduced mortality relative to normal weight patients. Compared with normal weight, risk of readmission for recurrent stroke was also lower in obese stroke patients.

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