Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Friday, June 2, 2017

Detecting Alzheimer’s Disease Before Symptoms Emerge

Your doctor should be using this to baseline your cognition since you are likely to get dementia. If s/he doesn't baseline you at all, my opinion would be incompetency on their part.
1. A documented 33% dementia chance post-stroke from an Australian study?   May 2012.
2. Then this study came out and seems to have a range from 17-66%. December 2013.
3. A 20% chance in this research.   July 2013.
http://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-cognitive-tests-6801/

Summary: Researchers report a cognitive test can help detect Alzheimer’s in older people who express no symptoms of the disease.
Source: USC.
Cognitive tests can detect early Alzheimer’s disease in older adults without symptoms, according to a new Keck School of Medicine of USC study.
Long before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease become apparent to patients and their families, biological changes are occurring within the brain. Amyloid plaques, which are clusters of protein fragments, along with tangles of protein known as tau, form in the brain and grow in number, eventually getting in the way of the brain’s ability to function. These biological changes can be detected early in the course of Alzheimer’s disease through positron emission tomography (PET) scan or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Now, a new study led by Keck Medicine of USC neuropsychologist Duke Han, PhD, associate professor of family medicine (clinical scholar) at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California suggests that cognitive tests are also able to detect early Alzheimer’s in people without symptoms.
“In the last decade or so, there has been a lot of work on biomarkers for early Alzheimer’s disease,” Han says. “There are new imaging methods that can identify neuropathological brain changes that happen early on in the course of the disease. The problem is that they are not widely available, can be invasive and are incredibly expensive. I wanted to see whether the cognitive tests I regularly use as a neuropsychologist relate to these biomarkers.”
Putting neuropsychological measures to the test
Han and his colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 61 studies to explore whether neuropsychological tests can identify early Alzheimer’s disease in adults over 50 with normal cognition. The study, which was published in Neuropsychology Review, found that people who had amyloid plaques performed worse on neuropsychological tests of global cognitive function, memory, language, visuospatial ability, processing speed and attention/working memory/executive function than people who did not have amyloid plaques.
The study also found that people with tau pathology or neurodegeneration performed worse on memory tests than people with amyloid plaques. Amyloid plaques and tau pathology were confirmed by PET scan or cerebrospinal fluid analysis.
“The presumption has been that there would be no perceivable difference in how people with preclinical Alzheimer’s disease perform on cognitive tests. This study contradicts that presumption,” Han says.

Routine cognitive screenings: A new normal?

Han believes that the study results provide a solid argument for incorporating cognitive testing into routine, annual checkups for older people.
“Having a baseline measure of cognition before noticing any kind of cognitive change or decline could be incredibly helpful because it’s hard to diagnose early Alzheimer’s disease if you don’t have a frame of reference to compare to,” Han said. “If people would consider getting a baseline evaluation by a qualified neuropsychologist at age 50 or 60, then it could be used as a way to track whether someone is experiencing a true decline in cognition in the future.”
Image shows a head made up of items related to science, such as microscopes and atoms.
The study also found that people with tau pathology or neurodegeneration performed worse on memory tests than people with amyloid plaques. Amyloid plaques and tau pathology were confirmed by PET scan or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. NeuroscienceNews.com image adapted from the USC news release.
Early detection could be a powerful tool to manage Alzheimer’s, Han says, giving people precious time to try different medications or interventions that may slow the progression of the disease early on.
“While there’s no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, the earlier you know that you’re at risk for developing it, the more you can potentially do to help stave off that diagnosis in the future,” Han says. “For example, exercise, cognitive activity and social activity have been shown to improve brain health.”
An estimated 5 million people in the United States have Alzheimer’s, and that number could reach 16 million by 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.
About this neuroscience research article
Funding: Twenty-seven percent of this project’s funding ($2,000 in salary support) was funded by the National Institutes of Health under award number K23AG040625. Seventy-three percent of the project’s funding ($5,495) was not federally funded. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
Neuroscience News would like to thank Cynthia Smith for submitting this research news for inclusion.
Source: Cynthia Smith – USC
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is adapted from the USC news release.
Original Research: Abstract for “Detectable Neuropsychological Differences in Early Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease: A Meta-Analysis” by S. Duke Han, Caroline P. Nguyen, Nikki H. Stricker, and Daniel A. Nation in Neuropsychology Review. Published online May 11 2017 doi:10.1007/s11065-017-9345-5

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