Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Genetic Variation and Neuroplasticity: Role in Rehabilitation After Stroke

Stop with trying to predict stroke recovery and do something fucking useful for survivors. Research how to get to 100% recovery you blithering lazy idiots. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28628592

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

In many neurologic diagnoses, significant interindividual variability exists in the outcomes of rehabilitation. One factor that may impact response to rehabilitation interventions is genetic variation. Genetic variation refers to the presence of differences in the DNA sequence among individuals in a population. Genetic polymorphisms are variations that occur relatively commonly and, while not disease-causing, can impact the function of biological systems. The purpose of this article is to describe genetic polymorphisms that may impact neuroplasticity, motor learning, and recovery after stroke.

SUMMARY OF KEY POINTS:

Genetic polymorphisms for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), dopamine, and apolipoprotein E have been shown to impact neuroplasticity and motor learning. Rehabilitation interventions that rely on the molecular and cellular pathways of these factors may be impacted by the presence of the polymorphism. For example, it has been hypothesized that individuals with the BDNF polymorphism may show a decreased response to neuroplasticity-based interventions, decreased rate of learning, and overall less recovery after stroke. However, research to date has been limited and additional work is needed to fully understand the role of genetic variation in learning and recovery.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE:

Genetic polymorphisms should be considered as possible predictors or covariates in studies that investigate neuroplasticity, motor learning, or motor recovery after stroke. Future predictive models of stroke recovery will likely include a combination of genetic factors and other traditional factors (eg, age, lesion type, corticospinal tract integrity) to determine an individual's expected response to a specific rehabilitation intervention.
PMID:
28628592
PMCID:
PMC5477674
[Available on 2018-07-01]
DOI:
10.1097/NPT.0000000000000180

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