Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Sunday, June 18, 2017

REVIEW Robotic Devices and Brain Machine Interfaces for Hand Rehabilitation Post-stroke: Current State and Future Potentials

In case your doctor doesn't keep up-to-date with research, you can train your doctor. 21 pages.
http://www.research.ed.ac.uk/portal/files/24993853/ACMreview.pdf

Alistair C F McConnell 1* , Adam A Stokes 2 , Renan C Moioli 3 , Fabricio L Brasil 3 , Marta Vallejo 1 , David W Corne1 and Patricia A Vargas 1
Abstract This paper reviews the current state of the art in robotic-aided hand physiotherapy for post-stroke rehabilitation, including the use of brain machine interfaces (BMI). The main focus is on the technical specifications required for these devices to achieve their goals. From the literature reviewed, it is clear that these rehabilitation devices can increase the functionality of the human hand post-stroke. However, there are still several challenges to be overcome before they can be fully deployed. Further clinical trials are needed to ensure that substantial improvement can be made in limb functionality for stroke survivors, particularly as part of a programme of frequent at-home high-intensity training over an extended period. This review serves the purpose of providing valuable insights into robotics rehabilitation techniques in particular for those that could explore the synergy between BMI and the novel area of soft robotics.

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