Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Saturday, October 1, 2011

Blood Test May Help Spot Stroke

I wonder which test is better, the acrolein one mentioned here: I would hope these are faster and don't require specialized equipment(CT scans), then the tPA decision could be much easier.
http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2011/07/detecting-possible-stroke-biomarker-in.html
or glutamate:
http://www.webmd.com/stroke/news/20110929/blood-test-may-help-spot-stroke
A new blood test shows promise for helping to detect stroke.

In a preliminary study of 152 people, the test correctly identified 98% of those who had had an ischemic stroke and 86% of those who hadn't had one. Ischemic stroke is the most common type of stroke. It occurs when a clot blocks blood flow in the brain.


The test measures levels of a brain chemical called glutamate. When blood flow to the brain is impaired, glutamate is rapidly released into the bloodstream, says researcher Kerstin Bettermann, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey.


The findings were presented here at the annual meeting of the American Neurological Association.


How many years will this take for one of these tests to replace the scans that determine ischemia today?

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