Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Chronic Hemiparesis: Neuroscience Evidence from Basic Laboratory Research and Quantitative Structural Brain MRI in Patients with Diverse Disabling Neurological Disorders (S43.003)

Yes, we have known for years that CIMT works. This writeup did nothing to further that since it seems to contain no protocols or required damage diagnosis reports and efficacy ratings of the intervention.
http://www.neurology.org/content/88/16_Supplement/S43.003.short
  1. Edward Taub2
  1. Neurology vol. 88 no. 16 Supplement S43.003

Abstract

Objective: This presentation will review the basic neuroscience research origins and the effects of Constraint-Induced Movement therapy (CIMT) on CNS structural neuroplasticity.
Background: Experimental hemiparesis in primates overcame chronic limb nonuse by applying specific behavioral neuroscience principles. This research led to formulating a model for the origination of sustained motor disability after neurological injury and its improvement by a novel therapeutic program. The therapy became adapted to treating children and adults and termed CIMT. Over the past 25 years multiple worldwide Randomized Controlled Trials of CIMT enrolled nearly 2000 patients with diverse neurological disorders (stroke, cerebral palsy [CP], multiple sclerosis [MS]), which indicated superiority of the approach against control therapies, with large treatment Effect Sizes and sustained retention of improved spontaneous real-world use of the hemiparetic limb. Ongoing research will describe basic and clinical neuroimaging methods to explore the basis for the clinical efficacy of CIMT.
Design/Methods: (1) Basic neuroscience models of experimental limb nonuse in rodents that had undergone adapted CIMT, which were followed by histological studies. (2) Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of grey matter and Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) of white matter on structural brain MRI, which evaluated neuroplastic changes after upper extremity CIMT.
Results: (1) CIMT in rodents resulted in increased CNS axonal growth, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis compared to control interventions, parallel with improved paretic limb use. (2) VBM demonstrated profuse cortical and subcortical grey matter increase following CIMT for stroke, CP, and MS. TBSS indicated significantly improved white matter integrity in MS. Neither structural brain changes nor comparable improved paretic limb use followed control interventions.
Conclusions: CIMT is increasing worldwide practice to improve reduced real-world limb use in chronic hemiparesis in diverse neurological diseases and ages of patients. Structural CNS changes following CIMT may support improved and extended functional use of the paretic limb.
Study Supported by: NIH, National MS Society
Disclosure: Dr. Mark has nothing to disclose. Dr. Taub has nothing to disclose.

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