Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, May 22, 2017

Supplements are more dangerous than other processed foods, according to a Harvard doctor

All because of this fucking stupidity from your federal legislators. Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA): (DSHEA) defined dietary supplements as a category of food, which put them under different regulations than drugs. They are considered safe until proven otherwise. Caveat Emptor. This recalls the patent medicines in the 18th and 19th centuries. It took the  Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 to reign those in.
https://www.yahoo.com/beauty/supplements-more-dangerous-other-processed-160000289.html
  Erin Brodwin Sun, May 21 9:00 AM PDT

The words are printed inside a small square on the back of the bottle beneath bold lettering which claims to list the supplement's ingredients: "Proprietary blend."
Under the protective umbrella of these two words, a supplement maker does not have to list all of the details of what's in its product, according to Cohen, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
This "allows companies to put in ingredients without telling us the amounts," says Cohen, who spoke on a recent panel put on by The Forum, an event series organized by the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. "And those tend to be the higher-risk product."
The risks can be serious. Several supplements have been linked with an increase in certain cancers; others have been tied to an elevated risk of kidney stones. Although this research has been widely published, supplements continue to send roughly 20,000 people to the emergency room every year.
Cohen likes to compare the safety framework for supplements with that for food. "In food," says Cohen, "they have to meet what's known as the "generally recognized as safe," or GRAS, standard. That’s not the standard for ingredients introduced to supplements. The standard is not anywhere near that level of scrutiny."
There are some laws regulating dietary supplements, however. In 1994, Congress established the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) to address the labeling and safety of supplements, and several more recent regulations mandate that manufacturers observe what are known as "good manufacturing practices," or GMPs, including ingredient testing.
Under the DSHEA, ingredients listed under the "proprietary blend" category don't have to include information about individual amounts of ingredients in that category. Instead, they only have to list the total amount and list the ingredients within the "blend" in order by their weight.
This can be a huge problem when it comes to dosages, as certain amounts of the listed ingredients could have dangerous side effects or negative interactions with prescription drugs.
"From a regulatory perspective they’re all presumed to be safe but the reality is many people….are harmed by supplements," says Cohen.

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