Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It lays out what needs to be done to get stroke survivors closer to 100% recovery. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, October 1, 2018

Interventions involving repetitive practice improve strength after stroke: a systematic review

Useless crapola. We need protocols telling us EXACTLY what needs to be done. Not this guideline shit.
https://www.journalofphysiotherapy.com/article/S1836-9553(18)30115-2/fulltext
Open Access
Open access funded by Australian Physiotherapy Association

Abstract

Questions

Do interventions involving repetitive practice improve strength after stroke? Are any improvements in strength accompanied by improvements in activity?

Design

Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis.

Participants

Adults who have had a stroke.

Intervention

Any intervention involving repetitive practice compared with no intervention or a sham intervention.

Outcome measures

The primary outcome was voluntary strength in muscles trained as part of the intervention. The secondary outcomes were measures of lower limb and upper limb activity.

Results

Fifty-two studies were included. The overall SMD of repetitive practice on strength was examined by pooling post-intervention scores from 46 studies involving 1928 participants. The SMD of repetitive practice on strength when the upper and lower limb studies were combined was 0.25 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.34, I2 = 44%) in favour of repetitive practice. Twenty-four studies with a total of 912 participants investigated the effects of repetitive practice on upper limb activity after stroke. The SMD was 0.15 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.29, I2 = 50%) in favour of repetitive practice on upper limb activity. Twenty studies with a total of 952 participants investigated the effects of repetitive practice on lower limb activity after stroke. The SMD was 0.25 (95% CI 0.12 to 0.38, I2 = 36%) in favour of repetitive practice on lower limb activity.

Conclusion

Interventions involving repetitive practice improve strength after stroke, and these improvements are accompanied by improvements in activity.

Review registration

PROSPERO CRD42017068658. [de Sousa DG, Harvey LA, Dorsch S, Glinsky JV (2018) Interventions involving repetitive practice improve strength after stroke: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 64: 210–221]

More at link.

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