Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It lays out what needs to be done to get stroke survivors closer to 100% recovery. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, October 29, 2018

Minor stroke due to large artery occlusion. When is intravenous thrombolysis not enough? Results from the SITS International Stroke Thrombolysis Register

Thrombolysis is never enough. Because you are fucking ignoring the neuronal cascade of death. 
Are you that ignorant of stroke etiology? 

Minor stroke due to large artery occlusion. When is intravenous thrombolysis not enough? Results from the SITS International Stroke Thrombolysis Register 



First Published November 29, 2017 Research Article




Beyond intravenous thrombolysis, evidence is lacking on acute treatment of minor stroke caused by large artery occlusion. To identify candidates for additional endovascular therapy, we aimed to determine the frequency of non-haemorrhagic early neurological deterioration in patients with intravenous thrombolysis-treated minor stroke caused by occlusion of large proximal and distal cerebral arteries. Secondary aims were to establish risk factors for non-haemorrhagic early neurological deterioration and report three-month outcomes in patients with and without non-haemorrhagic early neurological deterioration.

We analysed data from the SITS International Stroke Thrombolysis Register on 2553 patients with intravenous thrombolysis-treated minor stroke (NIH Stroke Scale scores 0–5) and available arterial occlusion data. Non-haemorrhagic early neurological deterioration was defined as an increase in NIH Stroke Scale score ≥4 at 24 h, without parenchymal hematoma on follow-up imaging within 22–36 h.

The highest frequency of non-haemorrhagic early neurological deterioration was seen in 30% of patients with terminal internal carotid artery or tandem occlusions (internal carotid artery + middle cerebral artery) (adjusted odds ratio: 10.3 (95% CI 4.3–24.9), p < 0.001) and 17% in extracranial carotid occlusions (adjusted odds ratio 4.3 (2.5–7.7), p < 0.001) versus 3.1% in those with no occlusion. Proximal middle cerebral artery-M1 occlusions had non-haemorrhagic early neurological deterioration in 9% (adjusted odds ratio 2.1 (0.97–4.4), p = 0.06). Among patients with any occlusion and non-haemorrhagic early neurological deterioration, 77% were dead or dependent at three months.

Patients with minor stroke caused by internal carotid artery occlusion, with or without tandem middle cerebral artery involvement, are at high risk of disabling deterioration, despite intravenous thrombolysis treatment. Acute vessel imaging contributes usefully even in minor stroke to identify and consider endovascular treatment, or intensive monitoring at a comprehensive stroke centre, for patients at high risk of neurological deterioration.

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