Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It lays out what needs to be done to get stroke survivors closer to 100% recovery. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, October 29, 2018

Experimental vaccine may reduce post-stroke blood clot risk

This would be a vast improvement over warfarin and aspirin. Is your stroke hospital and doctors going to do one damn thing to see this gets tested in humans? Or will they sit with their heads up their asses sucking on their thumbs waiting for SOMEONE ELSE TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM? 

Experimental vaccine may reduce post-stroke blood clot risk

Hypertension Journal Report

October 29, 2018 Categories: Stroke News
Study Highlights:
  • An experimental vaccine might one day protect ischemic stroke survivors from developing blood clots and subsequent strokes.
  • The vaccine was found to be as safe and effective as one of the most widely used oral blood thinners currently used to reduce clotting risk.
Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT / 5 a.m. ET Mon., Oct. 29, 2018
DALLAS, Oct.29, 2018 — A vaccine may one day be able to replace oral blood thinners to reduce the risk of secondary strokes caused by blood clots, without increasing the risk of serious bleeding or triggering an autoimmune response, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.
People who have had a stroke caused by a blood clot (ischemic strokes) often need to take medications that make their blood less likely to clot, which helps prevent another stroke.
Japanese researchers successfully tested an experimental vaccine in mice and found that it provided protection against blood clots for more than two months without increasing the risk of bleeding or causing an autoimmune response. The lack of an autoimmune response is important, because it means the mice’s immune system did not perceive the vaccine as an “intruder” that needed to be attacked, which would have caused a reaction to the vaccine.
The vaccine, S100A9, inhibits blood clot formation and, during the study, protected the arteries of treated mice from forming new clots for more than two months, and additionally, worked as well as the oral blood thinner clopidogrel in a major artery, according to Hironori Nakagami, M.D., Ph.D., study co-author and professor at Osaka University, in Japan.
Developing a vaccine to replace and/or compliment daily, oral medications might save many lives and help prevent both secondary strokes and possibly heart attacks, according to Nakagami.
“Many stroke patients don’t take their blood thinning drugs as prescribed, which makes it more likely they will have another stroke. This vaccine might one day help solve this issue since it would only need to be injected periodically,” Nakagami said.
“We are continuing our research in hopes of being able to start clinical trials between five and ten years from now, but there are differences between mice and humans in how the vaccine will be recognized by the immune system,” he said. “We should be able to overcome such problems and believe this vaccine provides a very promising strategy in secondary prevention of stroke.”
Co-authors are Tomohiro Kawano, M.D.; Munehisa Shimamura, M.D., Ph.D.; Tatsuya Iso, M.D., Ph.D.; Hiroshi Koriyama, M.D., Ph.D.; Shuko Takeda; Tsutomu Sasaki, M.D., Ph.D.; Manabu Sakaguchi, M.D., Ph.D.; Ryuichi Morishita, M.D., Ph.D.; and Hideki Mochizuki, M.D., Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.
The Mochida Memorial Foundation for Medical and Pharmaceutical Research, the Japan Cardiovascular Research Foundation, and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development funded the study.

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