Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It lays out what needs to be done to get stroke survivors closer to 100% recovery. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

After stroke strikes, what comes next?

Damn, the tyranny of low expectations rears its ugly head again from the American Stroke Association. They shouldn't even be allowed to have stroke in their name until they actively try to solve all the problems in stroke. I expect 100% recovery, not this crapola they expect us to accept.  

And why are they doing NOTHING? Laziness? Incompetence? Or just don't care? No leadership? No strategy? Not my job?

After stroke strikes, what comes next?

PRESS RELEASE PR Newswire
Oct. 22, 2018, 07:37 AM
DALLAS, Oct. 22, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, the world's leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke, wants stroke survivors to know that while life may be different after a stroke, rehabilitation can help you regain some independence, decrease chances of another stroke and provide new goals for you to work toward.
Worldwide, stroke is the No. 2 cause of death and is a leading cause of long-term disability. Stroke is more disabling than it is fatal. However, stroke is largely beatable through high-quality rehabilitation and patient support and implementation of the Association's Rehabilitation Guidelines.
October 29 is World Stroke Day, and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is working with Medical City Healthcare in North Texas to help spread awareness of the need to act fast at the onset of stroke symptoms and the importance of rehabilitation.
"Rehabilitation is key to recovery after stroke," said Parita Bhuva, MD, Interventional Neurologist with Medical City Healthcare'sTexas Stroke Institute. "But up to a third of people who have a stroke do not participate in a rehab program."
Stroke rehabilitation can help patients build their strength, capabilities and confidence, potentially regaining skills and returning to independent living. Rehab can also help patients better manage other conditions they have, which may affect daily living or their risk for a second stroke.
"Stroke recovery begins the moment you suspect a stroke," said Dr. Bhuva. "The sooner a person can be treated for stroke, the more likely they are to have a successful outcome." Dr. Bhuva advises everyone to be ready to act FAST if they suspect a stroke.
The acronym F.A.S.T. stands for:
  • Face Drooping - Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person's smile uneven?
  • Arm Weakness - Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • Speech Difficulty - Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "The sky is blue."
  • Time to Call 9-1-1 - If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get to a hospital immediately. (Tip: Check the time so you'll know when the first symptoms appeared.)
Education about F.A.S.T is a part of the American Stroke Association's Together to End Stroke initiative, nationally sponsored by Medtronic. Together, the two organizations aim to help people to easily recognize the stroke warning signs to improve stroke outcomes.
The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Together to End Stroke™ initiative, nationally sponsored by Kindred Rehabilitation Services, raises awareness that stroke is largely beatable through high-quality rehabilitation, patient support and implementation of the AHA/ASA's Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery Guidelines.
For more information, visit www.StrokeAssociation.org.
About the American Heart Association The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation's oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
About the American Stroke AssociationThe American Stroke Association is devoted to saving people from stroke — the No. 2 cause of death in the world and a leading cause of serious disability. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat stroke. The Dallas-based association officially launched in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-888-4STROKE or visit StrokeAssociation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association receives funding mostly from individuals. Foundations and corporations donate as well, and fund specific programs and events. Strict policies are enforced to prevent these relationships from influencing the Association's science content. Financial information for the American Heart Association, including a list of contributions from pharmaceutical companies and device manufacturers, is available at https://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

SOURCE American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA)

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