Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Here's how much the US spends on Alzheimer's disease

Our stroke associations should have stroke statistics like this readily available and use them to get research funding from foundations to solve all the fucking problems in stroke. 

Costs to treat stroke in America may double by 2030

Costs to treat stroke may increase from $71.55 billion in 2010 to $183.13 billion


http://www.businessinsider.com/alzheimers-disease-spending-in-us-to-top-259-billion-2017-3
Alzheimer's disease is the only one of the top leading causes of death whose progression can't be slowed down or stopped. 
 The neurodegenerative disease affects about 5.5 million Americans, a number that's expected to balloon to 13.8 million by 2050
And the amount spent caring for people with Alzheimer's is expected to reach $259 billion in 2017, according to a report released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association.
"Everybody with a brain at risk and needs to care about this," Beth Kallmyer, vice president of constituent services for the Alzheimer’s Association told Business Insider.
The search for a treatment to Alzheimer's hasn't been going well. There are only four approved drugs that treat symptoms of the disease, and several hopeful treatments have failed key studies over the last few months. 
So while death rates for illnesses such as HIV and heart disease have dropped over the past 14 years, the Alzheimer's Association noted, Alzheimer's deaths are up 89% over that period. 

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