Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, March 13, 2017

A new public health crisis: Preventable harm in healthcare

Preventable harm in stroke is simple to understand but difficult to get stroke medical leaders to acknowledge or solve. Stopping the 5 causes of the neuronal cascade of death in the first week.
 http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/a-new-public-health-crisis-preventable-harm-healthcare?
Preventable harm in healthcare is now a public health crisis and requires a nationwide, coordinated response, said a leading patient safety organization.
Indeed, studies point to medical errors as a leading cause of death in the United States, and the National Patient Safety Foundation Monday issued a “call to action” (PDF) for a coordinated public health response to take steps to prevent avoidable errors.
“Too often, efforts to blame individuals and organizations for preventable harm diverts attention and resources away from a more effective and sustainable collective response,” the organization announced on Monday, the first day of patient safety awareness week.
The NPSF said greater collaboration and a nationwide adoption of a public health framework will help guide efforts to prevent healthcare harm. This type of approach has already helped reduce healthcare-associated infections, the organization said.
Despite localized efforts to improve patient safety, the scare of improvement has been limited and inconsistent, according to the NPSF. Some healthcare organizations have successfully implemented improving strategies, such as
using checklists, medication barcoding, revamped care transitions), but others haven’t yet been able to introduce the interventions or replicate the results.
Instead of finger-pointing and blame, the agency urges more collaboration and a coordinated, system-wide effort geared at providing safe care delivery across the continuum of care. This will require the support of healthcare workers, patient and families.
The call to action urges:
  • The creation of a national steering committee patient safety to set national patient harm reduction goals and establish a nationwide action plan.
  • The establishment of a centralized and coordinated national oversight of patient safety.
  • Partnership with patients and families by engaging them in their care.
  • Creation of national patient safety benchmarks to effective measure and monitor progress, and eliminate invalid measures.
  • Identification of the causes of harm and interventions that work. This will require funding for research on preventing healthcare harm and the creation of a Health IT Safety Center that optimizes technology and minimizes unintended consequences.
  • Expansion of resources to support the healthcare workforce, including initiatives to improve working conditions and establishment of communication, apology and resolution programs.

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