Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Short leukocyte telomere length is associated with cardioembolic stroke risk in patients with atrial fibrillation

And you really think doctors will order this test and have a way to ameliorate the stroke risk from this?
https://www.mdlinx.com/internal-medicine/medical-news-article/2016/03/11/atrial-fibrillation-diabetes-mellitus-heart-failure/6553452/?
Stroke, 03/11/2016
The authors hypothesize that telomere shortening constitutes a novel risk factor for cardioembolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Telomere shortening is associated with cardioembolic stroke risk in patients with AF. Prospective studies are encouraged to establish the value of LTL to improve prediction tools to categorize cardioembolic stroke risk in AF.

Methods

  • The peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length (LTL) was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 187 patients with AF, 93 of them without stroke history and 94 of them having suffered 1 cardioembolic stroke.
  • Percentiles were calculated according to LTL values in the nonstroke group to estimate the cardioembolic stroke risk associated with LTL using logistic regression models.

Results

  • Short LTL values were independently and dose-dependently associated with an increased risk of cardioembolic stroke, with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.93 (1.24-6.94) and 6.26 (2.01-19.52), respectively, for sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, and age-adjusted models using the LTL 10th and 5th percentile cut-offs, respectively.
Go to PubMed Go to Abstract Print Article Summary Cat 2 CME Report

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