Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Can nicotine protect the aging brain?

Part of the reason why I'm going to do nicotine patches after my next stroke. I'm 100% positive my doctor will have no clue on why I will be doing what I'm doing post-stroke.
Like these 31 hyperacute possibilities.
http://www.mdlinx.com/family-medicine/medical-news-article/2016/09/22/6871000/?category=last-month&page_id=1 
 
Texas A&M research shows how this component of cigarettes might actually be beneficial on its own.
Everyone knows that tobacco products are bad for your health, and even the new e–cigarettes may have harmful toxins. However, according to research at Texas A&M, it turns out the nicotine itself – when given independently from tobacco – could help protect the brain as it ages, and even ward off Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease. Ursula Winzer–Serhan, PhD, an associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine, and her collaborators found that nicotine’s ability to be neuroprotective may be partly due to its well–known ability to suppress the appetite. Their research was published in the Journal of Toxicology. Using animal models, Winzer–Serhan and her collaborators added nicotine to the animal’s drinking water. There were three different groups that received nicotine at three different concentrations (low, medium and high) corresponding to occasional, low and medium smokers, respectively, in addition to a control group that did not receive any nicotine. The two groups that received nicotine at low and medium doses didn’t show any levels of the drug in their blood and they experienced no changes in food intake, body weight or number of receptors in the brain where nicotine acts. In contrast, the group getting the highest concentration of nicotine ate less, gained less weight and had more receptors, indicating that at higher doses, the drug gets into the brain where it can impact behavior. However, even at high doses, it didn’t seem to have worrying behavioral side effects like making the individuals more anxious, which the researchers were concerned could happen. The next step is to test nicotine’s potential anti–aging effects using aged animal models. Although early results indicate that nicotine can keep older individuals from gaining weight like the control group does, Winzer–Serhan hasn’t yet determined whether this lower body mass index translates into less degeneration of the brain. It is also unclear if nicotine’s effects are related only to its ability to suppress appetite, or if there are more mechanisms at work. “Although the results are intriguing, we would need large–scale clinical trials before suggesting anyone change their behavior,” she said. “At the end of the day, we haven’t proven that this addictive drug is safe – and it certainly isn’t during childhood or adolescence – or that the benefits outweigh the potential risks.” (Weasel words)
Go to Abstract Print Article Summary Cat 2 CME Report

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