Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Functional Electrical Stimulation and Its Use During Cycling for the Rehabilitation of Individuals with Stroke

You'll have to have your doctor get and implement the details into your recovery protocols.
https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-72736-3_21

  • Elisabetta Peri
  • Eleonora Guanziroli
  • Simona Ferrante
  • Alessandra Pedrocchi
  • Franco Molteni
  • Elisabetta Peri
    • 1
  • Eleonora Guanziroli
    • 2
  • Simona Ferrante
    • 1
  • Alessandra Pedrocchi
    • 1
  • Franco Molteni
    • 2
  1. 1.NEARLab, Department of Electronic, Information and BioengineeringPolitecnico di MilanoMilanItaly
  2. 2.Valduce HospitalVilla Beretta Rehabilitation CenterComoItaly
Chapter
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 19)

Abstract

Stroke disease involves an increasing number of subjects due to the aging population. In clinical practice‚ the presence of widely accessible rehabilitative interventions to facilitate the patients’ motor recovery‚ especially in the early stages after injury when wider improvement can be gained‚ is crucial to reduce social and economical costs. The functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been investigated as a tool to promote locomotion ability in stroke patients. Particular attention was given to FES delivered during cycling‚ which is recognized as a safe and widely accessible way to provide a FES-based rehabilitative intervention in the most impaired subjects. In this chapter the neurophysiological basis of FES and its potential correlates to facilitate the long-term reorganization at both cortical and spinal level have been discussed. A discussion on clinical evidence and possible future direction is also proposed.

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