Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Thursday, April 26, 2018

New Brain Health Index Can Predict Cognitive Function After Stroke

Who gives a fuck about predictions? Survivors want results you blithering idiots.  What are the protocols that prevent cognitive decline post stroke? Are you that fucking stupid you don't even know what to research?
http://dgnews.docguide.com/new-brain-health-index-can-predict-cognitive-function-after-stroke?
GLASGOW, United Kingdom -- April 20, 2018 -- A new computer programme developed by scientists at the Universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow can assess whole brain deterioration and help predict cognitive function after stroke up to 10-times more accurately than current methods.
The new approach, published today in the International Journal of Stroke, can quantify visible brain injury from cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) and brain atrophy by translating the million plus bits of information stored in brain scans into a single measure, the “brain health index.”
SVD features and brain tissue atrophy both increase with age, are often present together, and are risk factors for stroke and dementia.
The brain health index may also give early warning of risk of future cognitive decline in individuals before they notice any symptoms. There are currently limited treatments to prevent or delay declining cognition or dementia due to vascular disease, but if risk is identified early, then development of these diseases might be slowed with lifestyle adjustments and treatments for risk factors like blood pressure.
Joanna Wardlaw, MD, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, said: “We found that putting all visible factors on the scan together gave better prediction, yet most current computer methods do not consider all factors available on the scan and may not be suitable for older patients. This is what led to the development of the “brain health index.”
David Alexander Dickie, PhD, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, said: “We recognised a need for a more inclusive approach to assessing common brain disorders of ageing. Our new method allows us to use every piece of information from a brain scan, rather than just individual features of the brain that can only tell us so much about a person’s risk for cognitive problems.”
The study recruited 288 participants in Edinburgh, including 157 patients with minor stroke, 51 patients with lupus, and 80 healthy working age volunteers. The brain health index predicted more strongly cognitive deficits commonly seen in stroke and SVD than current, validated clinical scoring methods and other computer programmes used for assessing features of brain deterioration.
Dr Dickie added: “Through a unique collaboration between the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, which is funded by the Stroke Association in the UK, the next step is to test the brain health index approach in newly-developed brain scanners, such as the ultra-high resolution 7 Tesla scanner at the University of Glasgow’s Imaging Centre of Excellence, and in larger groups of patients.
“Eventually we hope to introduce brain health index into clinical practice so that it may improve early identification and treatment of cognitive decline and dementia after stroke.”
Reference: doi: 10.1177/1747493018770222
SOURCE: University of Glasgow

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