Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Some antidepressants may be linked to dementia: study

So when your doctor prescribes antidepressants to help your recovery YOU need to make sure they are not causing these problems.

Antidepressants may help people recover from stroke even if they are not depressed Jan. 2013



Some antidepressants may be linked to dementia: study

Paris (AFP) - Long-term use of certain anti-depressants have been linked to dementia in a large British study, researchers said Thursday, though they could not definitively conclude that the drugs were the cause.
The study in more than 300,000 people in Britain found that those diagnosed with dementia were almost a third more likely to have been prescribed so-called anticholinergic medicines to treat depression and certain bladder conditions between four and 20 years earlier.
"What we don't know for sure is whether the medication is the cause" of the dementia, said George Savva from the University of East Anglia's School of Health Science. He had co-authored the study in the BMJ medical journal.
"It could be that these medications are being prescribed for very early symptoms indicating the onset of dementia."
Anticholinergic drugs block certain nerve impulses to reduce spasms of the bladder muscles, for example, and to ease depression symptoms or Parkinson's Disease.
Anticholinergic anti-depressants include Amitriptyline, Dosulepin, and Paroxetine, said the researchers who had compared the medical records of 40,770 dementia patients over 65 to those of 283,933 people without dementia.
"More than 50 million people worldwide are affected by dementia and this number is estimated to be 132 million by 2050," Savva said in a statement.
"Developing strategies to prevent dementia is therefore a global priority."
The study results suggested a "potential preventative approach" that demands further investigation.
The team urged people taking anticholinergic medicines not to stop until they have consulted their doctor or pharmacist.


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