Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Treatment for Stroke That Could Permanently Repair Brain Damage Stroke

I bet nothing will come of this because we have NO stroke leadership and NO stroke strategy. This will join the hundreds and thousands of research pieces I have already talked about that are circling the drain, never to be seen again.
http://www.healthcarepublication.com/treatment-for-stroke-repair-brain/
Researchers from the University of Manchester have developed a new treatment that could limit the damage caused by treatment for stroke and also promote repair in the affected area of the brain. What’s more, the drug they’re using has already been clinically approved.
The researchers’ study is published in Brain, Behavior and Immunity, and it recounts how they developed their treatment using mice bred to develop ischemic treatment for stroke, the most prevalent type of stroke and one that occurs when an artery that supplies oxygen-rich blood to the brain is blocked. Soon after the mice experienced a stroke, the researchers treated them with interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an anti-inflammatory drug that is already licensed for use in treating rheumatoid arthritis.
They noticed a reduction in the amount of brain damage typically observed after a treatment for stroke and also noted that the drug boosted neurogenesis (the birth of new cells) in the areas that did experience brain damage in the days following the treatment. The mice even regained the motor skills they lost due to the stroke.
The researchers’ study is published in Brain, Behavior and Immunity, and it recounts how they developed their treatment using mice bred to develop ischemic treatment for stroke, the most prevalent type of stroke and one that occurs when an artery that supplies oxygen-rich blood to the brain is blocked. Soon after the mice experienced a stroke, the researchers treated them with interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an anti-inflammatory drug that is already licensed for use in treating rheumatoid arthritis.
They noticed a reduction in the amount of brain damage typically observed after a treatment for stroke and also noted that the drug boosted neurogenesis (the birth of new cells) in the areas that did experience brain damage in the days following the treatment. The mice even regained the motor skills they lost due to the stroke.

HOPE FOR A CURE

Treatment for stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and about 800,000 people suffer from one each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). They occur when the flow of blood to the brain is interrupted, usually due to a blood clot or a buildup of fat that broke off from the arteries and traveled to the brain. The condition is extremely dangerous because brain cells can die within a few minutes of the treatment for stroke, causing permanent damage or even death.
Must Read:  What is stroke? Treatment for stroke
We still don’t have a treatment to adequately prevent or reverse the damage to the brain caused by treatment for stroke, but the Manchester researchers believe that their development could change that. Though they are still in early stages of clinical trials, they hope to eventually move on to larger trials and eventually human testing. Together with other research, this new study offers hope to the thousands of people whose lives are impacted by strokes worldwide.

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