Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Sunday, January 22, 2017

Bye-bye fillings! Alzheimer’s drug lets teeth repair themselves - using stem cells

With any brains at all in the stroke medical world we would be having researchers see if anything here could be useful for stem cells in the brain. But that statement was a hoot, there are no brains in the stroke medical world.
https://www.yahoo.com/tech/bye-bye-fillings-alzheimer-drug-213832463.html

So long fillings! Researchers from King’s College London have developed a method for stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in teeth, using a drug developed to help with Alzheimer's.

Dentistry has come a long way since the bad old days when they’d whip out all your teeth at the slightest excuse. But while that may true, many of us still have metal or plastic fillings to plug holes in damaged teeth.
Fortunately, researchers from the U.K.’s King’s College London are on the case — and they may have just found a way to banish artificial fillings for good. What they describe in a new research paper, published in the journal Science Reports, is a method for stimulating the renewal of living stem cells in teeth, using a drug developed to help with Alzheimer’s.
To put it another way, it could soon be possible to trigger damaged teeth to repair themselves.

The human body is able to heal small amounts of dental damage, by activating the tooth contact stem cells in the tooth’s soft inner core, known as the pulp. In situations such as tiny cracks or fissures, these cells are stimulated to differentiate into specific tooth cells. Known as odontoblasts, these cells can then make new dentine and replace the area that is damaged.
However, this natural repair doesn’t work for more significant damage — although it was enough to teach the King’s College researchers a valuable lesson.
“We have studied the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this natural repair and, based on this, have developed a simple method to enhance the process by overstimulating the stem cells,” lead researcher Paul Sharpe told Digital Trends. “The result is a more robust repair that can fill in bigger holes. The process produces a natural repair that maintains tooth structure.”
The researchers hope that such a solution will remove the failure rate associated with artificial methods of plugging holes in teeth.
As to when this process may be available to the public, Sharpe said that the current plan is to begin a clinical trial next year. “The research so far has been generously supported by the Medical Research Council in the U.K. and we aim to turn to them to support the trials,” he said.

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