Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Friday, April 14, 2017

Meta-analysis of effects of voluntary slow breathing exercises for control of heart rate and blood pressure in patients with cardiovascular diseases

Is it better to slow breath for blood pressure or fast breathing to get nitric oxide in your bloodstream?  Nitric oxide which relaxes narrowed blood vessels, increasing oxygen and blood flow.
I bet nitric oxide applied immediately after your stroke would help your recovery, but you will need to tell your doctor that.
Does your doctor even understand the question?

Creation of nitric oxide via Breath of Fire

Meta-analysis of effects of voluntary slow breathing exercises for control of heart rate and blood pressure in patients with cardiovascular diseases

 

The American Journal of Cardiology
Zou Y, et al. – This study was designed to elucidate the efficacy of voluntary slow breathing exercises (VSBE) in attenuating resting heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Researchers obtained evidence from RCTs demonstrating a marked reduction in resting HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in patients who practiced short–term VSBE.

Methods

  • Researchers searched Embase (1974 to April 2016), PubMed (1966 to April 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 4, April 2016) and PEDro (www.pedro.org.au) (1999 to April 2016).
  • The primary outcome was the mean change in resting HR.
  • Secondary outcomes included changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) as well as compliance with the breathing training.

Results

  • This analysis included a total of 6 studies consisting of 269 subjects.
  • Researchers observed that practice of the breathing exercises resulted in statistically significant HR reduction [mean difference: -1.72 beats/min, 95% confidence interval (CI): -2.70 to -0.75].
  • Findings demonstrated reductions in SBP (mean difference: -6.36 mmHg, 95% CI: -10.32 to -2.39) and DBP (mean difference: -5.63 mmHg, 95% CI: -7.40 to -3.86) compared to the controls.
  • Trial durations ranged from 2 weeks to 6 months.

 

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