Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, July 17, 2017

Stroke recovery may be delayed up to decades after injury, study shows

This is why plateau is not a valid medical term in stroke, it is only an insurance term to cut off therapy and save costs for the company. The insurance company cares not one whit about your recovery, that is not part of their goals and objectives. Making money is their goal, the hell with their customers. Your contract with them does not state anything about results, just 'care' and processes.
http://www.news-medical.net/news/20170712/Stroke-recovery-may-be-delayed-up-to-decades-after-injury-study-shows.aspx

Stroke survivors may experience delayed recovery of limb function up to decades after injury, according to a new case study. The article, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for July.
The subject of the study is a man who suffered a stroke at age 15, leaving his left hand nonfunctional even after a regimen of physical therapy. Twenty-two years after the stroke, the man started swimming regularly after his doctor suggested it to lose weight. One year later, the man was able to move his left fingers in a limited capacity. He returned to physical therapy for several years and improved his recovery to the point of picking up small objects with his left hand.
Researchers in London, Ontario, Canada, performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while the man flexed his fingers. They found that the nerve cells that control sensation (sensimotor neurons) on both sides of the brain had reorganized more than two decades after the stroke, leading to regained function. The research team suggested that a combination of physical activity and his young age when the stroke occurred might explain the late recovery. The man had previously regained function in his shoulder and elbow; the increase in activity seen with swimming may have provoked the reorganization of the sensimotor neurons. "The marked delayed recovery in our patient and the widespread recruitment of bilateral areas of the brain indicate the potential for much greater stroke recovery than is generally assumed," the researchers wrote.

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