Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Alzheimer’s Drug May Help Treat Traumatic Brain Injury

9 posts going back to 2014 show memantine being useful for stroke recovery. And  yet I see nothing in the ASA, NSA or WSO about this or any reference to a memantine protocol anywhere. Once again proving we have NO stroke leadership and NO stroke strategy. Obviously nobody cares. Your doctor doesn't care. Your stroke hospital doesn't care. You're screwed along with your children and grandchildren. Hopefully schadenfreude hits the appropriate people.
http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=177557&CultureCode=en
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of disability and death globally, but medications have generally failed to benefit patients. A new study found that memantine, a drug that is used to treat dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease, may be a promising therapy.

The study examined the effect of memantine on blood levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a marker of neuronal damage, and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) in patients with moderate TBI. The GCS is the most common scoring system used to describe the level of consciousness in a person following a TBI.
Patients with moderate TBI who received memantine had significantly reduced blood levels of NSE by day 7 and marked improvements in their GCS scores on day 3 of the study.
The study is published in The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.
Access the Paper:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jcph.980/full

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