Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Study of Israelis and Palestinians calls for rethinking how HDL protects against coronary heart disease

Can no one get out of this fixation on cholesterol?  You fucking idiots, cholesterol is not the problem, inflammation is, which grabs the cholesterol out of the bloodstream packing it into plaque.  Learn about cause and effect and stop trying to force statins to be the only solution.
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-08-israelis-palestinians-rethinking-hdl-coronary.html
The idea that plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is protective against coronary heart disease has been part of medical conventional wisdom for five decades. HDL-C has traditionally been considered the most important component of so-called "good cholesterol" HDL. However, drug trials that increased HDL-C have failed to support a causal role for the amount of cholesterol carried in HDL in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease.
With advances in the separation of lipoproteins by size and functionality, research has intensified to identify HDL measures that may be better predictors of coronary heart disease than the traditional HDL-C. Recent evidence suggests that small, dense, protein-rich particles in HDL may be more atheroprotective than large, buoyant cholesterol-rich particles.
To explore this further, 274 Arabs and 230 Jews residing in Jerusalem were recruited for a new study by researchers at the Braun School of Public Health in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Medicine. This work, led by Prof. Jeremy Kark of the Hebrew University-Hadassah Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, was undertaken by Dr. Chobufo Ditah, a physician from Cameroon, as his thesis for the Braun School's International Masters of Public Health program.
The researchers used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to identify the numbers and sizes of plasma HDL particles, and helical CT-scanning to identify calcification in their coronary arteries, reflecting the overall burden of . With these data in hand, they looked for associations between the concentrations and sizes of different HDL particles, and .
Their findings, published in the prestigious journal Atherosclerosis, showed a statistically significant inverse association of both the number of HDL particles (HDL-P) and the concentration of small and medium-sized HDL particles (MS-HDL-P) with coronary artery calcification, after adjusting for age, statin use, smoking, and other factors. There was no association between large HDL-P and coronary in either population group. The association with HDL-C was weaker and inconsistent between men and women.
"Our findings indicate that HDL-P and MS-HDL-P are better independent markers of , as reflected by calcification, than HDL-C, at least in this bi-ethnic population of Israelis and Palestinians," said Dr. Chobufo Ditah.
"These findings support previous reports, based on studies in other population groups, suggesting that small dense HDL particles are protectively associated with risk of coronary . The consistency of this finding in a new population of urban Arabs and Jews, using different disease outcomes and different separation methods, add more strength to those findings," added Dr Ditah.
"With a better understanding of HDL's complexity and a better ability to measure its components, it is now possible to move past HDL-C to more refined measures that better reflect HDL's role in coronary . Based on the accumulating evidence, incorporation of MS-HDL-P or HDL-P into the routine prediction of risk should be considered," said Prof Jeremy Kark.
More information: Small and medium sized HDL particles are protectively associated with coronary calcification in a cross-sectional population-based sample. Atherosclerosis, Volume 251, August 2016, Pages 124–131. Chobufo Ditah, James Otvos, Hisham Nassar, Dorith Shaham, Ronit Sinnreich, Jeremy D. Kark. DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.06.010

Provided by: Hebrew University of Jerusalem search and more info

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