Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Enhancing functional communication recovery of people with aphasia after a stroke: realising opportunities for enriching the communicative environment during routine rehabilitation

Now to put this into a publicly available stroke protocol database so every stroke survivor that needs it has access.
https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/63662/
Horton, Simon, Shiggins, Ciara and Lane, Kathleen (2017) Enhancing functional communication recovery of people with aphasia after a stroke: realising opportunities for enriching the communicative environment during routine rehabilitation. In: International Congress on NeuroRehabilitation and Neural Repair, 2015-05-20 - 2015-05-22.
Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Background: Studies in human and animal models indicate that recovery from stroke is enhanced by exposure to enriched environments and practice. People with aphasia (PWA) after stroke need to practice language in everyday situations for optimum recovery of communication function. Objective: To establish whether opportunities to provide cost-neutral enriched environments for functional communication practice can be realised during routine stroke rehabilitation. Methods: Video was used to record routine interactions between healthcare professionals (HCPs) and people with aphasia in in-patient and Early Supported Discharge stroke rehabilitation. We conducted semi-structured interviews with staff and patients. Datasets produced: 54 video-recordings of therapy and nursing interactions in diverse rehabilitation activities; interviews with 19 HCPs; and 9 PWA. Video and interview data were analysed using Activity-based Communication Analysis and inductive thematic analysis respectively. Costs were derived from staff reports of changes to usual time taken for activities when communicating with PWA. 
Results: Opportunities to provide communicatively enriched environments arose in both settings between PWA and staff from all professional groups. When realised these occasions increased experiential demands cognitively and socially on PWA and provided them with functional communication practice. However, opportunities were not consistently realised. Interviews suggested that time constraints, a lack of HCP training and low confidence in working with PWA may have contributed to these effects. There were small increases in staff time demands resulting from these interactions. 
Conclusion: Opportunities to produce stimulating environments for functional communication practice can be realised during routine rehabilitation, but there are staff time cost and training implications.
Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: stroke,aphasia,rehabilitation
Faculty \ School: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
University of East Anglia > Faculty of Social Sciences > Research Centres > Centre for Applied Research in Education
Depositing User: Pure Connector
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2017 06:10
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2017 06:10
URI: https://ueaeprints.uea.ac.uk/id/eprint/63662
DOI:

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