Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Thursday, August 4, 2016

New review examines potential of antioxidant therapies to combat neurodegenerative disorders

Would anything here help stroke recovery?
http://www.news-medical.net/news/20160802/New-review-examines-potential-of-antioxidant-therapies-to-combat-neurodegenerative-disorders.aspx
A new review examines the potential of antioxidant approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis.
Certain compounds that are involved in oxidative stress look like promising therapeutic targets. For example, researchers are investigating the potential of increasing antioxidant capacity by targeting what's known as the Nrf2 pathway, as well as developing inhibitors of NADPH oxidases, which are key sources of reactive oxygen species. Other potential strategies for limiting oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases include reducing the production of nitric oxide, or preventing mitochondrial dysfunction.
"There are still several gaps in our understanding of the basis of oxidative damage in neurodegenerative disorders; however, it is increasingly accepted that many diseases share common pathways of oxidative stress-related damage, and it's likely that significant progress will be made in the design and implementation of effective therapeutic strategies in the next few years," said Dr. Gethin McBean, lead author of the British Journal of Pharmacology review.
Source:
Wiley

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