Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Low Serum Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Were Associated with Poor Short-Term Functional Outcome and Mortality in Acute Ischemic Stroke

What is your doctor doing to make sure your BDNF levels are not low? I've only written 97 posts on this.   Followup research is needed for time periods after 3 months, which will never occur.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12035-016-0236-1

  • Jing Wang
  • Li Gao
  • Yan-Long Yang
  • Yu-Qian Li
  • Tao Chang
  • Ming-Hao Man
  • Xing-Ye Zhang
  • Shao-Chun Guo
  • Li-Hong Li
  • Jing Wang
    • 1
  • Li Gao
    • 1
  • Yan-Long Yang
    • 1
  • Yu-Qian Li
    • 1
  • Tao Chang
    • 1
  • Ming-Hao Man
    • 1
  • Xing-Ye Zhang
    • 1
  • Shao-Chun Guo
    • 1
  • Li-Hong Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryTangdu Hospital of Fourth Military Medical UniversityXi’anPeople’s Republic of China
Article
DOI: 10.1007/s12035-016-0236-1
Cite this article as:
Wang, J., Gao, L., Yang, YL. et al. Mol Neurobiol (2016). doi:10.1007/s12035-016-0236-1
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

Circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been highlighted as being a key regulator of rehabilitation-induced recovery after stroke. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between serum levels of BDNF and functional outcome and mortality events in a 3-month follow-up study in a cohort of patients with an acute ischemic stroke (AIS). From January 2015 to December 2015, consecutive first-ever AIS patients admitted to the Department of Emergency of our hospital were identified. Serum BDNF levels were measured at admission. Functional outcome was evaluated at 3 months using the modified Rankin scale (m-Rankin). We used logistic regression models to assess the relationship between BDNF levels and functional outcome or mortality. In this study, 204 patients were included. Patients with poor outcomes and non-survivors had significantly lower BDNF levels on admission (P < 0.0001 all). Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for common risk factors showed that BDNF levels in the lowest interquartile (≤1st 9.2 ng/ml) was an independent predictor of functional outcome (odds ratios [OR] = 3.75; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 2.43–8.12) and mortality (OR = 4.04; 95 % CI, 2.07–9.14). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of BDNF was 0.77 (95 % CI, 0.70–0.84) for functional outcome and 0.79 (95 % CI, 0.71–0.86) for mortality. The findings indicated that low serum levels of BDNF at admission were significantly associated with poor short-term functional outcome and mortality, suggesting that BDNF may serve as a biomarker of poor function outcome after stroke.

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