Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, November 21, 2016

Mapping the rehabilitation interventions of a community stroke team to the extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke

Useless with no mention of how close they got to 100% recovery results.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09638288.2016.1239763?journalCode=idre20

Pages 1-7 | Received 02 Feb 2016, Accepted 19 Sep 2016, Published online: 20 Nov 2016


Purpose: This study aim was to evaluate whether the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke captured the interventions of a community stroke rehabilitation team situated in a large city in New Zealand. It was proposed that the results would identify the contribution of each discipline, and the gaps and differences in service provision to Māori and non-Māori. Applying the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke in this way would also inform whether this core set should be adopted in New Zealand.
Method: Interventions were retrospectively extracted from 18 medical records and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke. The frequencies of linked interventions and the health discipline providing the intervention were calculated.
Results: Analysis revealed that 98.8% of interventions provided by the rehabilitation team could be linked to the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke, with more interventions for body function and structure than for activities and participation; no interventions for emotional concerns; and limited interventions for community, social and civic life. Results support previous recommendations for additions to the EICSS.
Conclusions: The results support the use of the Extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke in New Zealand and demonstrates its use as a quality assurance tool that can evaluate the scope and practice of a rehabilitation service.
  • Implications for Rehabilitation
  • The Extended International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke appears to represent the stroke interventions of a community stroke rehabilitation team in New Zealand.
  • As a result, researchers and clinicians may have increased confidence to use this core set in research and clinical practice.
  • The Extended International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke can be used as a quality assurance tool to establish whether a community stroke rehabilitation team is meeting the functional needs of its stroke population.

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