Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, November 28, 2016

Desmoteplase 3 to 9 Hours After Major Artery Occlusion Stroke

Whom is going to plan and execute followup research that will find and significantly improve functional outcome at 3 months?  A great stroke association would handily do this. I blame our boards of directors for allowing promising research to languish forever.
http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/47/12/2880.abstract?etoc


Abstract

Background and Purpose—The DIAS-3 trial (Efficacy and Safety Study of Desmoteplase to Treat Acute Ischemic Stroke [phase 3]) did not demonstrate a significant clinical benefit of desmoteplase administered 3 to 9 hours after stroke in patients with major artery occlusion. We present the results of the prematurely terminated DIAS-4 trial together with a post hoc pooled analysis of the concomitant DIAS-3, DIAS-4, and DIAS-J (Japan) trials to better understand the potential risks and benefits of intravenous desmoteplase for the treatment of ischemic stroke in an extended time window.
Methods—Ischemic stroke patients with occlusion/high-grade stenosis in major cerebral arteries were randomly assigned to intravenous treatment with desmoteplase (90 μg/kg) or placebo. The primary outcome was modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0 to 2 at day 90. Safety assessments included mortality, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, and other serious adverse events.
Results—In DIAS-4, 52 of 124 (41.9%) desmoteplase-treated and 46 of 128 (35.9%) placebo-treated patients achieved an mRS score of 0 to 2 (odds ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.79; 2.64; P=0.23) with equal mortality, frequency of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, and other serious adverse events in both the treatment arms. In the pooled analysis, mRS score of 0 to 2 was achieved by 184 of 376 (48.9%) desmoteplase-treated versus 171 of 381 (44.9%) placebo-treated patients (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.95; 1.85; P=0.096). Treatment with desmoteplase was safe and increased the recanalization rate (107/217 [49.3%] versus 85/222 [38.3%]; odds ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–2.35; P=0.019). Recanalization was associated with favorable outcomes (mRS 0–2) at day 90 in both the treatment arms.
Conclusions—Late treatment with intravenous 90 µg/kg desmoteplase is safe, increases arterial recanalization, but does not significantly improve functional outcome at 3 months.
Clinical Trial Registration—URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00856661.

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