Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Friday, September 30, 2016

10 Things to Remember When It Seems Like Things Won’t Get Better

What psychological couseling are you getting in the hospital? All I got was the counselor trying to get me to agree that my body failed me by having a stroke. I was totally on my own to figure out how to stay positive. I did get the question; 'Are you having suicidal thoughts?' I was smart enough not to give any hint that I knew how to do it but would never take that step. The easiest way for me would have been to kneel in front of our 3-4 foot deep goldfish pond and just tip forward. But I was stubborn enough to know that I could get over this setback.

10 Things to Remember When It Seems Like Things Won’t Get Better

So far away that we can’t even see it, and it seems our flares and bad days will never end.
Whether it’s depressionanxiety, migraines, fibromyalgia or anything else you may have, here are ten things to remember when you think things will never get better.
1. Life is a cycle.
It’s a continuously shifting balance of up and down. If it’s down season right now, ride it out. The seasons will change again.
2. If you need help or if you’re a danger to yourself or others, go to the hospital — now.
It may seem like the worst place in the world, but the goal of hospitalization is to get stable in the least amount of time as possible.
3. Try mental health therapy, no matter what your diagnosis is.
We know our family and friends may be tired of hearing us complain, but we can’t keep it all in either. Find a therapist you connect with and share whatever you want. Therapy is a safe place with no judgment, and it’s all confidential. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) even has a Crisis Text Line so you can be connected with a crisis counselor.
4. Ask for help. Don’t be stubborn.
I know we’re warriors and don’t want to ask for help, but when we’re hurting, we need help. Sometimes we don’t need help, and sometimes we need a lot of help. Don’t force yourself to go downstairs to get the water if you only end up falling down the stairs. Trust me, that only makes it worse.
5. You are not a burden.
Let me repeat that because so many of us feel that way: You are not a burden. You are a wonderful, loved, cherished person.
6. Listen to your body. 
Your body sends you signals for a reason. Pay attention to them. If all you want to do is sleep, then sleep. Sleep is restorative and healing. If you need medication, then take medication. It’s not weak. It’s taking care of ourselves.
7. Find people who understand.
Many of us aren’t able to leave our homes easily, and therefore, we might have to go online to meet some new people. Conduct some Facebook searches and find a good support group for your condition or read articles or find forums. That always helps me.
8. Share your story.
It externalizes it from yourself. You can do this by writing a journal, talking to people and starting a blog. Take your story and use it to do some good.
9. Don’t apologize.
This is not your fault. These things are out of your control, and it’s a disease, a disability or a sickness. You have no reason to apologize. (I’m still working on this one, too.)
10. Never give up.
Find something to hold on to. A pet that needs you take care of it, a family member to lean on and all the people in your corner. Music is also great. Find some empowering tunes that you can sing along to. Find music you love and put on some headphones. Jam out. If you can drive, roll the windows down. Drive on a road where there’s not a lot of congestion and you’re surrounded by nature. Turn the music up, drive and sing your worries away.  
You can do this. You will do this. It will get better. All progress, no matter how small, is progress. I’ve been down and out enough, whether manic or bottom of the pits of depressed, suffering from extreme panic attacks or all of my chronic conditions are flaring at once, and I can’t see my way out of it. But my love repeats these words to me: “It’s just down season. It will get better.” And it’s true.
You are important. You are loved. You are the world to someone. You are worth not giving up on, and it will get better.
If you or someone you know needs help, visit our suicide prevention resources page.
If you need support right now, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. You can reach the Crisis Text Line by texting “START” to 741-741.

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