Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Risk for depression appears to be higher in first three months after stroke, study finds

Pretty much a totally fucking useless piece of information. It gives no solutions at all. The most obvious solution would be to lower the dead and damaged neurons substantially by stopping the neuronal cascade of death by these 5 causes in the first week.  Or at least prescribe antidepressants automatically since they help recovery even if not depressed. But I bet your doctor hasn't read a single piece of research in the last 10 years.

Common antidepressant can help stroke patients improve movement and coordination Sept. 2015 

Antidepressants may help people recover from stroke even if they are not depressed Jan. 2013 

The useless article here:

 Risk for depression appears to be higher in first three months after stroke, study finds

During the first three months after stroke, the risk for depression was eight times higher than in a reference population of people without stroke, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry.
More than 10 million people had a stroke in 2013 and more than 30 million people worldwide live with a stroke diagnosis.
Merete Osler, M.D., D.M.Sc., Ph.D., of Copenhagen University, Denmark, and coauthors used data linked from seven Danish nationwide registers to examine how risk and risk factors for depression differ between patients with stroke and a reference population without stroke, as well as how depression influences death.
Among 135,417 patients with stroke, 34,346 (25.4 percent) had a diagnosis of depression within two years after stroke and more than half of the cases of depression (n=17,690) appeared in the first three months after stroke.
In a reference population of 145,499 people without stroke, 11,330 (7.8 percent) had a depression diagnosis within two years after entering the study and less than a quarter of the cases (n=2,449) appeared within the first three months, according to the results.
The risk of depression in patients during the first three months after stroke was eight times higher than in the reference population without stroke, the authors report.
Major risk factors for depression for patients after stroke and in the reference population were older age, female sex, living alone, basic educational attainment, diabetes, a high level of somatic comorbidity, history of depression and stroke severity (in patients with stroke), according to the results.
In both groups - patients with stroke and the reference population without stroke - depressed individuals, especially those with new onset, had increased risk of death from all causes.
Study limitations include a definition of depression that was based on psychiatric diagnoses and filling of antidepressant prescriptions, and most cases were defined by filling antidepressants, which can be prescribed for various diseases.
"Depression is common in patients with stroke during the first year after diagnosis, and those with prior depression or severe stroke are especially at risk. Because a large number of deaths can be attributable to depression after stroke, clinicians should be aware of this risk," the study concludes.
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals


 

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