Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, November 7, 2016

Wearable Robotic Limb Helps Patients With Gait Rehab

But is this any better that these 80 posts on exoskeletons? Bet your doctor doesn't know about more than one and your hospital has none in their therapy department.
http://www.asianscientist.com/2016/11/tech/wearable-robot-exoskeleton-rehab/
A prototype of the lower-limb exoskeleton being developed
at Beihang University in Beijing, China. Credit: Beihang University Read more from Asian Scientist Magazine at: http://www.asianscientist.com/2016/11/tech/wearable-robot-exoskeleton-rehab/

AsianScientist (Nov. 7, 2016) - Researchers in China and Denmark have designed a lower-limb wearable robot exoskeleton that features natural knee movement, greatly improving patient comfort and their willingness to wear it for gait rehab. Their design was published in Review of Scientific Instruments. Stroke and spinal cord injury patients often require gait rehabilitation to regain the ability to walk or to help strengthen their muscles. Wearable robot-assisted training is quickly emerging as a method that helps improve this rehab process, but exoskeleton robots aren’t new—they’ve been studied extensively and many designs have focused on lower limbs. Here, researchers from Beihang University and Aalborg University have developed a robotic exoskeleton that is intended to help stroke patients strengthen their physical fitness, aid the rehabilitation training of paralyzed patients, or to assist those who need help performing daily activities. The knee joint’s motion is actuated by several skeletal muscles along its articular surfaces, and its center of rotation moves. It is the first known use of a parallel mechanism at the knee joint to imitate skeletal muscles. A prototype of the lower-limb exoskeleton being developed at Beihang University in Beijing, China. Credit: Beihang University A prototype of the lower-limb exoskeleton being developed at Beihang University in Beijing, China. Credit: Beihang University “Our new design features a parallel knee joint to improve the bio-imitability and adaptability of the exoskeleton,” explained Dr. Chen Weihai, a professor at Beihang University’s School of Automation Science and Electrical Engineering. The article can be found at: Lyu et al. (2016) Design of a Biologically Inspired Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Human Gait Rehabilitation. Read more from Asian Scientist Magazine at: http://www.asianscientist.com/2016/11/tech/wearable-robot-exoskeleton-rehab/
AsianScientist (Nov. 7, 2016) - Researchers in China and Denmark have designed a lower-limb wearable robot exoskeleton that features natural knee movement, greatly improving patient comfort and their willingness to wear it for gait rehab. Their design was published in Review of Scientific Instruments. Stroke and spinal cord injury patients often require gait rehabilitation to regain the ability to walk or to help strengthen their muscles. Wearable robot-assisted training is quickly emerging as a method that helps improve this rehab process, but exoskeleton robots aren’t new—they’ve been studied extensively and many designs have focused on lower limbs. Here, researchers from Beihang University and Aalborg University have developed a robotic exoskeleton that is intended to help stroke patients strengthen their physical fitness, aid the rehabilitation training of paralyzed patients, or to assist those who need help performing daily activities. The knee joint’s motion is actuated by several skeletal muscles along its articular surfaces, and its center of rotation moves. It is the first known use of a parallel mechanism at the knee joint to imitate skeletal muscles. A prototype of the lower-limb exoskeleton being developed at Beihang University in Beijing, China. Credit: Beihang University A prototype of the lower-limb exoskeleton being developed at Beihang University in Beijing, China. Credit: Beihang University “Our new design features a parallel knee joint to improve the bio-imitability and adaptability of the exoskeleton,” explained Dr. Chen Weihai, a professor at Beihang University’s School of Automation Science and Electrical Engineering. The article can be found at: Lyu et al. (2016) Design of a Biologically Inspired Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Human Gait Rehabilitation. Read more from Asian Scientist Magazine at: http://www.asianscientist.com/2016/11/tech/wearable-robot-exoskeleton-rehab/

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