Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Time-restricted feeding study shows promise in helping people shed body fat

This would seem to also have dementia prevention possibilities along with neurogenesis.

To Stave off Alzheimer’s, Stay Hungry?  May 2013

Researchers: Mini-Fast Prevents Alzheimer's  Feb. 2013

Intermittent fasting attenuates increases in neurogenesis after ischemia and reperfusion and improves recovery  Feb. 2014

Has your doctor done ONE fucking thing about creating a diet protocol for all its benefits? 4 years and done absolutely nothing?  Or is s/he waiting for SOMEONE ELSE TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM? That answer will tell how incompetent your doctor and stroke hospital are. Oops, once again telling Drs. and PhDs they don't know what the hell needs to be done. Don't listen to me, I'm not medically trained, but you don't need medical training to see incompetency in action. Do you want your children and grandchildren to have better stroke recoveries? Then speak up!

Time-restricted feeding study shows promise in helping people shed body fat


UAB Medicine

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers are trying to find out whether changing a person’s eating schedule can help them lose weight and burn fat.

The first human test of early time–restricted feeding, or eTRF, found that this meal–timing strategy reduced swings in hunger and altered fat and carbohydrate burning patterns, which may help with losing weight. With eTRF, people eat their last meal by the mid–afternoon and do not eat again until breakfast the next morning. The findings were unveiled during a presentation at the Obesity Week 2016 meeting.

“Eating only during a much smaller window of time than people are typically used to may help with weight loss,” said Courtney Peterson, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences at UAB. “We found that eating between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. followed by an 18–hour daily fast kept appetite levels more even throughout the day, in comparison to eating between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., which is what the average American does.”

This new research, funded by a TOS Early Career Research Grant awarded in 2014, suggests that eating a very early dinner, or even skipping dinner, may have some benefits for losing weight, although further studies need to take place to confirm that theory. Previous animal studies showed that eTRF helped rodents burn more fat.

The human body has an internal clock, and many aspects of metabolism are at their optimal functioning in the morning. Therefore, eating in alignment with the body’s circadian clock by eating earlier in the day may positively influence health. This first test of eTRF in humans follows rodent studies of this approach to weight loss, which previously found that eTRF reduced body fat and decreased the risk of chronic diseases in rodents.

During the human study, Peterson and her colleagues followed 11 men and women with excess weight over four days of eating between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m., and four days of eating between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Researchers then tested the impact of eTRF on calories burned, fat burned and appetite. Participants tried both eating schedules, ate the same number of calories both times and completed all testing under supervision.

Researchers found that, although eTRF did not affect how many total calories participants burned, it reduced daily hunger swings and increased fat burning during several hours at night. It also improved metabolic flexibility, which is the body’s ability to switch between burning carbs and burning fats.

Whether eTRF helps with long–term weight loss or improves other aspects of health is still unknown. Peterson says that, because the human study involved only a small number of participants, a larger, more comprehensive study will need to take place.

 

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