Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Strength of ~20-Hz Rebound and Motor Recovery After Stroke

No clue what this means. Only 57 references to support it that your doctor should know all about.
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1545968316688795
First Published February 4, 2017 research-article

Background. Stroke is a major cause of disability worldwide, and effective rehabilitation is crucial to regain skills for independent living. Recently, novel therapeutic approaches manipulating the excitatory-inhibitory balance of the motor cortex have been introduced to boost recovery after stroke. However, stroke-induced neurophysiological changes of the motor cortex may vary despite of similar clinical symptoms. Therefore, better understanding of excitability changes after stroke is essential when developing and targeting novel therapeutic approaches.  
Objective and Methods. We identified recovery-related alterations in motor cortex excitability after stroke using magnetoencephalography. Dynamics (suppression and rebound) of the ~20-Hz motor cortex rhythm were monitored during passive movement of the index finger in 23 stroke patients with upper limb paresis at acute phase, 1 month, and 1 year after stroke.  
Results. After stroke, the strength of the ~20-Hz rebound to stimulation of both impaired and healthy hand was decreased with respect to the controls in the affected (AH) and unaffected (UH) hemispheres, and increased during recovery. Importantly, the rebound strength was lower than that of the controls in the AH and UH also to healthy-hand stimulation despite of intact afferent input. In the AH, the rebound strength to impaired-hand stimulation correlated with hand motor recovery. Conclusions. Motor cortex excitability is increased bilaterally after stroke and decreases concomitantly with recovery. Motor cortex excitability changes are related to both alterations in local excitatory-inhibitory circuits and changes in afferent input. Fluent sensorimotor integration, which is closely coupled with excitability changes, seems to be a key factor for motor recovery.

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