Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Sunday, February 26, 2017

The associations between insomnia and health-related quality of life in rehabilitation units at 1 month after stroke

Yes, they have documented a problem but give NO fucking solution(protocol) on how to address that problem. A great stroke association president would give a tongue lashing to these researchers for not doing useful research.
 This is where a great stroke association president would keep the research focus on solving all the problems in stroke, not just describing them.  
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022399916305220

Highlights

The prevalence of insomnia at one month after stroke onset was 59.5%.
The patient with insomnia was more likely to be older and female.
The patient with insomnia was more likely to have depression and anxiety.
Insomnia was associated with physical and mental HRQoL.

Abstract

Objective

The principal objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between insomnia and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the early stage of stroke rehabilitation.

Methods

The subjects were 214 first-time stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit at one of three Korean hospitals. Within 7 days after stroke, functions were evaluated using; the Berg Balance Scale, the Modified Barthel Index, the Mini Mental State Examination, the Frontal Assessment Battery, Screening Tests for Aphasia and Neurologic-Communication Disorders, and the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Insomnia, depression, anxiety, and HRQoL were investigated at one month after stroke. Insomnia was defined as presence of at least one of the four following; difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, and non-restorative sleep. HRQoL was assessed using the Short Form Health survey SF-8. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the association between insomnia and HRQoL.

Results

The prevalence of insomnia at one month after stroke was 59.5%. Patients with insomnia were more likely to be older and female and to have depression and anxiety. Patients with insomnia had poorer physical and mental HRQoL. By multivariate analyses, physical HRQoL was significantly associated with type of stroke, hypnotic usage, balancing function, and insomnia. Mental HRQoL was significantly associated with balancing function, depression, and insomnia.

Conclusion

Insomnia was found to be negatively associated with physical and mental HRQoL in stroke patients during the early stage of rehabilitation.

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