Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Sunday, May 7, 2017

First evidence of ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells in post-stroke human brain

Now to just get some translational research done to get a stroke protocol set up. What is your doctor doing to accomplish this? Or is she/he just sitting on their asses doing nothing?
https://m.medicalxpress.com/news/2017-05-evidence-ischemia-induced-multipotent-stem-cells.html#jCp
Researchers have shown that following a stroke-induced ischemic injury to the human brain, stem cells are produced that have the potential to differentiate and mature to form neurons that can help repair the damage to the brain. The new clinical study that provides direct evidence of ischemia-induced stem cells (iSCs) in brain tissue removed during treatment of post-stroke patients is published in Stem Cells and Development.
In the article entitled "Identification of Multipotent Stem Cells in Human Brain Tissue Following Stroke," Kotaro Tatebayashi, Yasue Tanaka, Akiko Nakano-Doi, and coauthors from Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan, present this first clinical report describing the isolation of iSCs from the post-stroke human . The were situated near blood vessels in areas of the brain containing neurons that had died as a result of stroke-related lack of oxygen. The iSCs expressed multiple stem cell markers, demonstrated high proliferative potential, and were shown to be multipotent in culture with the ability to differentiate into various cell types including neurons.
"This excellently performed demonstration in the confirms previous work in the mouse that showed cerebral ischemia induced that were restricted to areas of the brain damaged by stroke," says Editor-in-Chief Graham C. Parker, PhD, The Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI.

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