Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Sunday, May 7, 2017

How To Boost Your Cognitive Reserves To Limit Decline In Later Life

How do I know if I have brain reserve? I'm sure mine got mostly used up in surviving and recovering from my stoke. I need to know specifics about how much I need to prevent dementia.
http://www.spring.org.uk/2017/05/boost-cognitive-reserves.php?omhide=true
The five factors linked to healthier brain aging.
Staying in education or taking on a leadership role at work can help people keep their brains healthy for longer, new research finds.
Doing challenging activities in mid-life, the study found, helps people fight off dementia later on.
Professor Linda Clare said:
“Losing mental ability is not inevitable in later life.
We know that we can all take action to increase our chances of maintaining our own mental health, through healthy living and engaging in stimulating activities.
It’s important that we understand how and why this occurs, so we can give people meaningful and effective measures to take control of living full and active lives into older age.
People who engage in stimulating activity which stretches the brain, challenging it to use different strategies that exercise a variety of networks, have higher ‘Cognitive reserve’.
This builds a buffer in the brain, making it more resilient.
It means signs of decline only become evident at a higher threshold of illness or decay than when this buffer is absent.”
The conclusions come from the study of 2,315 people over 65.
They found the following factors were linked to healthier brain aging:
  • Moderate alcohol consumption (meaning not too much alcohol, not that teetotalers need to start drinking!). I'm good with this, resveratrol is great.
  • Mentally stimulating activity. Work, solving all the problems in stroke since no one else is.
  • Physical activity. 70,000 steps a week.
  • Social activity. Several meetup groups, Wine group friends.
  • Healthy diet. So-so on this.
Professor Bob Woods, who co-authored the study, said:
“We found that people with a healthier lifestyle had better scores on tests of mental ability, and this was partly accounted for by their level of cognitive reserve.
Our results highlight the important of policies and measures that encourage older people to make changes in their diet, exercise more, and engage in more socially oriented and mentally stimulating activities.”
The study was published in the journal PLOS Medicine (Clare et al., 2017).

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