Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

In Search of the Guiding Light: Revisiting the Use of Oral and High-efficacy Therapies in a Modern Era of Multiple Sclerosis Treatment

Well shit we have all these new therapies except for our fucking failures of stroke associations doing nothing for stroke. You are completely screwed.

Updates from Berlin: New Developments in Huntington’s Disease  Feb. 2017 

Multiple Sclerosis @Point of Care app with Dr. Watson  Dec. 2016 

Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF) Parkinsons' progress  Dec. 2016 

Regular intake of grapes may protect against early memory decline linked to Alzheimer's disease  Feb. 2017


In Search of the Guiding Light: Revisiting the Use of Oral and High-efficacy Therapies in a Modern Era of Multiple Sclerosis Treatment

Pre-activity question 1 of 4

A 32-year-old woman diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well controlled on interferon beta-1a and would like to be switched to oral medications. Which advice would be most appropriate to give her?
  • Patients who are well controlled on injectable drugs but switch to oral therapies are not at greater risk of early relapse.
  • The rate of first relapse is much greater in the first 6 months when switching from injectable to oral medications.
  • Disability progression is greater in the first 6 months when switching from injectable to oral medications.
  • Oral medications are ineffective unless combined with injectable medicatio

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