Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Single dose of siRNA molecule offers protection against heart attack and stroke in high-risk patients

I was never a high risk patient so this would do absolutely no good for me.  You'll have to ask your doctor is this might apply to you.
http://www.news-medical.net/news/20170330/Single-dose-of-siRNA-molecule-offers-protection-against-heart-attack-and-stroke-in-high-risk-patients.aspx
Even a single dose of a specific ribonucleic acid molecule, known as a small interfering RNA (siRNA), offers patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease long-lasting protection against high LDL cholesterol - one of the main risk factors for heart attack and stroke. This is the result of a clinical study that researchers from Charité and Imperial College London have published as leading authors in the current edition of New England Journal of Medicine.
As a component of cell walls and a building block of numerous hormones, cholesterol plays an important role in the cell's lipid metabolism. However, too much LDL cholesterol in the blood results in an increased risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and problems such as heart attack and stroke. Patients suffering from a genetic disorder which causes very high levels of LDL cholesterol are at a particularly high risk. In these patients, a protein known as PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) prevents the liver from removing LDL cholesterol from the blood.
In their study, Prof. Ulf Landmesser, Head of Charité's Department of Cardiology (Campus Benjamin Franklin), and Prof. Kausik Ray from Imperial College London, used the principle of RNA interference. The process, which was discovered a few years ago, uses RNA molecules (small interfering RNA) to inhibit the synthesis of harmful proteins. When double-stranded siRNA is introduced into a cell, it will bind to a molecule known as the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC complex). This allows the process to be used in a targeted manner to silence specific genes.
In their study, the researchers investigated how effective and efficient a specific siRNA was at targeting the PCSK9 protein. A total of 501 high-risk patients with high LDL cholesterol levels received varying subcutaneous doses of either inclisiran or placebo. Results showed that inclisiran led to a significant reduction in levels of both the protein and LDL cholesterol, with LDL cholesterol levels being reduced by up to 41.9 percent after a single dose, and up to 52.6 percent after two doses.
"It was particularly interesting to see just how sustained the effect of treatment was, with the effect of a single dose remaining apparent for a duration of over nine months," explains Prof. Ulf Landmesser. He adds: "The next step will be to further develop this treatment by conducting a large clinical outcome trial. We are hoping to test what might become a new type of therapy for the prevention of heart attack and stroke in high-risk patients."

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