Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, December 12, 2016

Brain Activity May Predict Risk of Falls in Older People

I know this is in healthy people but if we had ANY stroke leadership at all a research project would be set up to see what brain activity in stroke survivors could predict falls. That will never occur until all the current stroke associations are destroyed.
http://dgnews.docguide.com/brain-activity-may-predict-risk-falls-older-people?overlay=2&nl_ref=newsletter&pk_campaign=newsletter
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn -- December 7, 2016 -- Measuring the brain activity of healthy, older adults while they walk and talk at the same time may help predict their risk of falls later, according to a study published in the December 7, 2016, online issue of Neurology.
“In older people who had no signs of disease that would make them prone to falls, higher levels of activity in the prefrontal cortex were associated with a higher risk of falls later in life,” said Joe Verghese, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. “This suggests that these people were increasing their activation of brain cells or using different parts of the brain to compensate for subtle changes in brain functioning.”
For the study, researchers looked at 166 people with an average age of 75 years who had no disabilities, dementia or problems with walking. They then used brain imaging to measure changes in oxygen in the blood in the front of the brain as each person walked, recited alternate letters of the alphabet, and then did both tasks at the same time. The researchers then interviewed participants every 2 to 3 months over the next 4 years to see if they had fallen.
Over that time, 71 people in the study reported 116 falls; 34 people fell more than once. Most falls were mild with only 5% resulting in fractures.
The study found higher levels of brain activity while both walking and talking were associated with falls, with each incremental increase of brain activity associated with a 32% increased risk of falls. Such an association was not found when looking at brain activity levels during just walking or talking. The speed of the walking and naming letters did not help predict who was more likely to fall.
The relationship between brain activity and falls risk was the same after researchers accounted for other factors that could affect a person’s risk of falling, such as slow walking speed, frailty, and previous falls.
“These findings suggest that there may be changes in brain activity before physical symptoms like unusual gait appear in people who are more prone to falls later,” said Verghese. “More research needs to be done to look at how brain and nerve diseases associated with falls impact brain activity in their earliest phases. We also know there are other areas of the brain which may play a role in increasing fall risk, so those too should be studied.”
SOURCE: American Academy of Neurology

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