Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Friday, September 2, 2016

Merck finally ditches osteoporosis drug odanacatib after stroke risk

If we had anything other than fucking failures of stroke associations we would have a database of drugs, supplements and foods and their stroke risks. But we have nothing so you are once again going to have to do everything yourself. Start saving your money for hiring researchers or befriend some billionaires.
http://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/merck-finally-ditches-osteoporosis-drug-odanacatib-after-stroke-risk

Merck ($MRK) is giving up on its delayed and long-troubled bone drug odanacatib after it became apparent the safety risk from using the experimental med was just too high.
Two years’ ago the Big Pharma announced it was to delay a filing with the FDA after Phase III results showed that while the drug could reduce fractures, it also increased the risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.
It had hoped for a 2015 U.S. approval, but was forced to hold fire on the safety concerns. Today, finally, Merck has officially said it will bury the program. Odanacatib works by inhibiting cathepsin K, an enzyme that plays a key role in bone resorption.
It had once been touted as a major blockbuster potential for Merck, making this a big setback for the company, which will need to rely a little harder on its Keytruda sales.
“The company has decided to discontinue development after an independent adjudication and analysis of major adverse cardiovascular events confirmed an increased risk of stroke,” Merck said in a brief statement released this morning.
The data from the analysis of the drug, which has led to it being ditched, will be presented at the American Society for Bone Mineral Research later this month.
“We are disappointed that the overall benefit-risk profile for odanacatib does not support filing or further development,” said Roger Perlmutter, president, Merck Research Laboratories.
“We are very thankful to the researchers and patients who participated in the odanacatib clinical development program. We have learned that odanacatib treatment reduces the risk of osteoporotic fractures. At the same time, we believe that the increased risk of stroke in our Phase 3 trial does not support further development.”

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