Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Monday, September 12, 2016

New imaging technique will help understand muscle contracture after a stroke

How long before this is rolled out to your stroke hospital? Probably won't do one damn bit of good right now since there is no cure for spasticity. And a phone number for your doctor to call.
https://blog.neura.edu.au/2016/09/muscle-contracture-after-stroke/#sthash.G6k2GnGc.dpbs


Cutting-edge imaging technologies are being used to understand what causes muscle contracture after a stroke and how we can improve treatments.
dti_gastrocnemius
Example of a 3D reconstruction of the muscle fibre structure of a human calf muscle (medial gastrocnemius) using diffusion tensor imaging.
We believe a lot of fundamental questions about muscles have yet to be answered, but that may be about to change with the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).
DTI is an MRI-based imaging technique typically used to measure white matter in the brain. Recent advancements in imaging technology have allowed researchers, like ourselves, to more accurately measure muscle fibres as well.
A recent study we conducted revealed that DTI produces more reliable images and minimises the effect of errors typically found in ultrasound images. This is because muscles have complex 3D shapes, so 3D methods such as DTI have many advantages over the more conventional 2D techniques like ultrasound imaging.
We’ll put this information to good use in a new clinical trial aimed at understanding the cause of muscle contracture (stiffening of muscles) in stroke. Contracture is a common cause of disability in people who have had a stroke and, at present, the mechanisms that cause contracture are poorly understood. Additionally, current intervention strategies to treat contracture have been shown to be ineffective. Clearly, there is a need to improve our current understanding of contracture so that it can be treated effectively.
We are seeking volunteers to participate in the study. Participants could be people of any age who have had a stroke and have some physical disability, or healthy people aged over 60. Participation in the study involves coming to NeuRA and having an MRI scan. The visit, including the scan, takes around two hours.
If you are interested in finding out more about the study, please call NeuRA on 02 9399 1832 and ask to speak with Arkiev D’Souza, or send an email to a.dsouza@neura.edu.au with your enquiry.
 

Cutting-edge imaging technologies are being used to understand what causes muscle contracture after a stroke and how we can improve treatments.
dti_gastrocnemius
Example of a 3D reconstruction of the muscle fibre structure of a human calf muscle (medial gastrocnemius) using diffusion tensor imaging.
We believe a lot of fundamental questions about muscles have yet to be answered, but that may be about to change with the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).
DTI is an MRI-based imaging technique typically used to measure white matter in the brain. Recent advancements in imaging technology have allowed researchers, like ourselves, to more accurately measure muscle fibres as well.
A recent study we conducted revealed that DTI produces more reliable images and minimises the effect of errors typically found in ultrasound images. This is because muscles have complex 3D shapes, so 3D methods such as DTI have many advantages over the more conventional 2D techniques like ultrasound imaging.
We’ll put this information to good use in a new clinical trial aimed at understanding the cause of muscle contracture (stiffening of muscles) in stroke. Contracture is a common cause of disability in people who have had a stroke and, at present, the mechanisms that cause contracture are poorly understood. Additionally, current intervention strategies to treat contracture have been shown to be ineffective. Clearly, there is a need to improve our current understanding of contracture so that it can be treated effectively.
We are seeking volunteers to participate in the study. Participants could be people of any age who have had a stroke and have some physical disability, or healthy people aged over 60. Participation in the study involves coming to NeuRA and having an MRI scan. The visit, including the scan, takes around two hours.
If you are interested in finding out more about the study, please call NeuRA on 02 9399 1832 and ask to speak with Arkiev D’Souza, or send an email to a.dsouza@neura.edu.au with your enquiry.
- See more at: https://blog.neura.edu.au/2016/09/muscle-contracture-after-stroke/#sthash.G6k2GnGc.dpuf

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