Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Running exercise protects against myelin breakdown in the absence of neurogenesis in the hippocampus of AD mice

Do we need this after a stroke? Have we demyelinated neurons in the brain? What does your doctor know about this and what is the protocol to fix it?  Scream at your doctor if you have to get her attention about actually fixing you up to 100% recovery.  How is your doctor getting you running again?
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006899318300155

Highlights

There were demyelinating lesions in the CA1 field of APP/PS1 transgenic mice.
Running exercise could delay atrophy in the CA1 field in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.
Running exercise could protect against myelin sheath degeneration in the absence of neurogenesis, thereby reducing CA1 atrophy and delaying the onset and progression of AD.
Exercise-related structural changes may be an important structural basis for the exercise-induced improvement of cognitive function in AD.

Abstract

Neurogenesis might influence oligodendrogenesis and selectively instruct myelination in the mammalian brain. Running exercise could induce neurogenesis and protect the myelin sheaths in the dentate gyrus of AD mice. It is unclear whether running exercise could protect the myelin sheaths in the absence of neurogenesis in the hippocampus of AD mice. Six-month-old male APP/PS1 transgenic mice were randomly assigned to a control group (Tg control) or a running group (Tg runner), and age-matched non-transgenic littermates were used as a wild-type group (WT control). The Tg runner mice were subjected to a running protocol for four months. The behaviors of the mice in the three groups were then assessed using the Morris water maze, and related quantitative parameters of the myelin sheaths within the CA1 field were investigated using unbiased stereological and electron microscopy techniques. Learning and spatial memory performance, CA1 volume, the volumes of the myelinated fibers, and myelin sheaths in the CA1 field were all significantly worse in the Tg control mice than in the WT control mice. Learning and spatial memory performance, CA1 volume and the volume of the myelin sheaths in the CA1 field were all significantly greater in the Tg runner mice than in the Tg control mice. These results indicated that there were demyelinating lesions in the CA1 field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice and that running exercise could protect against myelin sheath degeneration in the absence of neurogenesis, thereby reducing CA1 atrophy and delaying the onset and progression of AD.

Keywords

  • Myelin sheaths;
  • Myelinated fibers;
  • Field CA1;
  • Hippocampus;
  • APP/PS1 transgenic mouse;
  • Running exercise
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Corresponding author at:Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, P R China

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