Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

What’s your cognitive life expectancy? Maybe longer than you think

Now we just  need to get our stroke medical professionals to tell us what our cognitive life expectancy is based upon all the lost cognitive years we lost. And what can be done to prevent such decline. I expect a lot from my stroke medical team and publicly there is no reason to believe there is anything they actually know about 100% stroke recovery. I'm still going to be going strong at age 94, that gives me 32 years to convince the stroke medical world they know nothing about stroke and are doing nothing to solve the problems in stroke. I've written thousands of posts delineating what can and needs to be done. It is so fucking simple. 5 steps: Naysayers not allowed, you're not going to shit on my parade.
1.  Describe the problems exactly.
2.  Write thousands of RFPs to researchers to solve those problems.
3.  Fund them with foundation grants.
4.  Write stroke rehab protocols based on the research.
5.  Get the Nobel prize in medicine

MIND diet may slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors January 2018

The brain injury patients were estimated to be around five years older on average than their real age.  March 2015 

What’s your cognitive life expectancy? Maybe longer than you think

New research shows an expanding period of good brain health for older adults.

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You’ve turned 65 and exited middle age. What are the chances you’ll develop cognitive impairment or dementia in the years ahead?
New research about “cognitive life expectancy” — how long older adults live with good versus declining brain health — shows that after age 65 men and women spend more than a dozen years in good cognitive health, on average. And, over the past decade, that time span has been expanding.
By contrast, cognitive challenges arise in a more compressed time frame in later life, with mild cognitive impairment (problems with memory, decision-making or thinking) lasting about four years, on average, and dementia (Alzheimer’s disease or related conditions) occurring over 1 ½ to two years.
Even when these conditions surface, many seniors retain an overall sense of well-being, according to new research presented last month at the Population Association of America’s annual meeting.

Recent research finds that:
Most seniors don’t have cognitive impairment or dementia. Of Americans 65 and older, about 20 to 25 percent have mild cognitive impairment while about 10 percent have dementia, according to Dr. Kenneth Langa, an expert in the demography of aging and a professor of medicine at the University of Michigan. Risks rise with advanced age, and the portion of the population affected is significantly higher for people over 85.
Langa’s research shows that the prevalence of dementia has fallen in the U.S. — a trend observed in developed countries across the globe. A new study from researchers at the Rand Corp. and the National Bureau of Economic Research finds that 10.5 percent of U.S. adults age 65 and older had dementia in 2012, compared with 12 percent in 2000.
But gains are unequally distributed. Notably, college graduates can expect to spend more than 80 percent of their lifetime after age 65 with good cognition, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Southern California and the University of Texas at Austin. For people who didn’t complete high school, that drops to less than 50 percent.
Older adults have an expanding period of good brain health. With longer lives and lower rates of dementia, most seniors are enjoying more years of life with good cognition — a welcome trend.
Two years ago, Eileen Crimmins, AARP chair of gerontology at the University of Southern California’s Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, and her colleagues documented this shift in the United States in research using data about adults 65 and older from the Health and Retirement Study.
In 2000, she found, a 65-year-old woman could expect to live 12.5 years with good cognition, four years with mild cognitive impairment and 2.6 years with dementia, on average. A decade later, in 2010, the period in good cognition had expanded to 14.1 years, with 3.9 years spent with mild cognitive impairment and 2.3 years spent with dementia.
For men, the 2010 figures are different: 12.5 years with good cognition after age 65 (compared with 10.7 in 2000); 3.7 years with mild cognitive impairment (the same as in 2000); and 1.4 years with dementia (compared with 1.8 years in 2010).
Improvements in education and nutrition, better control of hypertension and cholesterol, cognitively demanding jobs in middle age, and social engagement in later life may all contribute to this expanded period of good brain health, the study noted.
Well-being often coexists with impairment. Bardo’s research adds another dimension to this literature by addressing two questions: Do older adults with cognitive impairment feel they have a good quality of life and, if so, for how long?
His study, which has not yet been published, focuses on happiness as an important indicator of quality of life. The data come from thousands of adults 65 and older who participated in the Health and Retirement Study between 1998 and 2012 and who were asked if they were happy “all/most of the time” or “some/none of the time” during the past week.
These answers were combined with information about cognitive impairment derived from tests that examined seniors’ ability to recall words and to count backward, among other tasks.
Findings suggest that cognitive impairment is not a deterrent to happiness. Of the period that seniors spent cognitively impaired, about 5.5 years on average, they reported being happy for 4.8 years — about 85 percent of the time. Of the 12.5 years that older adults spent in good cognitive health, they reported being happy nearly 90 percent of the time.
The bottom line: “Cognitive impairment doesn’t equate with unhappiness,” Bardo said. Still, he cautioned that his study didn’t look at how happiness correlates with the extent of impairment. Certainly, people with moderate to severe dementia experience serious difficulties in their lives, as do their caregivers, he noted.
Jennifer Ailshire, assistant professor of gerontology and sociology at USC’s Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, noted that happiness is often tied to personality characteristics, so this measure “doesn’t necessarily reflect how individuals with cognitive impairment are interacting with other people or their environment.”
Laura Gitlin, dean of the college of nursing and health professions at Drexel University, observed that happiness is only one element of living well with cognitive impairment and dementia. Going forward, she suggested, “there is much work to do” to identify what contributes more broadly to well-being and a positive quality of life in older adults with these conditions.

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