Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Researchers estimate $40 billion in annual costs to care for elderly stroke survivor

The National Stroke Plan similar to the National Alzheimers Plan  should address this need. 
http://www.news-medical.net/news/20160803/Researchers-estimate-2440-billion-in-annual-costs-to-care-for-elderly-stroke-survivors.aspx
It's assumed that family and friends will help out in the event of a medical crisis, but that's not always feasible. And when stroke survivors need more than 20 hours of care per week, as a study in the August edition of Stroke shows, it's a large burden for their loved ones.
More than half of elderly stroke survivors receive help from a caregiver, requiring 22.3 hours of assistance per week on average. That's nearly double what elderly patients who have not had a stroke require, at an average of 11.8 hours of help.
A group of University of Michigan researchers found the need for care translates to about $11,000 per stroke survivor per week, for an annual estimate of around $40 billion in costs to care for elderly stroke survivors.
"Previous studies underestimated the caregiving resources that are used, and we expect the cost of caregiving will only increase as baby boomers age," said first author Lesli Skolarus, M.D., M.S., a neurologist with the U-M Comprehensive Stroke Center.
Caregivers could include unpaid, like family and friends, along with paid caregivers, as about one-third of stroke survivors with informal care also receive paid care. Activities included in the estimate are accompanying the patient to physician appointments, cooking, cleaning, helping the patient eat, bathe and dress and helping with money matters and insurance decisions.
Using data from a national survey of Medicare beneficiaries, the team compared 892 elderly self-reported stroke survivors to 892 non-stroke controls, accounting for demographics and other health conditions, like hypertension, coronary heart disease or dementia.
The researchers determined more than half of elderly stroke survivors receive help from a caregiver, requiring 22.3 hours of assistance per week on average. That's nearly double what elderly patients who have not had a stroke require, at an average of 11.8 hours of help.
"Stroke survivors need a caregiver to spend the equivalent of half of a full-time job each week to help them," said senior author James Burke, M.D., M.S., a neurologist with U-M's Comprehensive Stroke Center and the Ann Arbor Department of Veterans Affairs. "Caregiving is an especially big burden in patients with neurological conditions."
Skolarus added, "We need to plan for other mechanisms to support caregivers and survivors. Hopefully planning now will reduce the future burden."
Source:
University of Michigan Health System


No comments:

Post a Comment