Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Friday, February 9, 2018

Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Cool. How is your doctor making sure you have neurogenesis? BDNF? exercise? melatonin? indomethacin? ghrelin, Hungry stomach hormone? Exosome mediated delivery of miR-124? and many more. Does your doctor know about ANY of them?
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-stem-cell-divisions-adult-brain.html
Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.
The generation of new cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain can generate new nerve cells throughout life. One of the areas where this happens is the hippocampus, a brain structure that determines many types of learning and memory, determining what is remembered and what is forgotten.
In a new study published in Science, the laboratory of Sebastian Jessberger, professor in the Brain Research Institute of the University of Zurich, has shown for the first time the process by which divide and newborn neurons integrate in the adult mouse hippocampus. The study, led by postdoc Gregor Pilz and Ph.D. student Sara Bottes, used in vivo two-photon imaging and genetic labeling of neural stem cells in order to observe stem cell divisions as they happened, and to follow the maturation of new nerve cells for up to two months. By observing the cells in action and over time the team showed how most stem cells divide only for a few rounds before they mature into neurons. These results offer an explanation as to why the number of newborn cells dramatically declines with advancing age.
% buffered00:00Current time00:24
Imaging over two months of two individual neural stem cells in the adult hippocampus that get activated at distinct time points (d, days after recombination) and generate neuronal progeny. Credit: UZH
"In the past, it was deemed technically impossible to follow single cell stem cells in the brain over time given the deep localization of the hippocampus in the brain," said Jessberger. The study answered longstanding questions in the field, but the researchers say that this is just the beginning of many more experiments aimed at understanding how human brains are able to form new nerve throughout life. "In the future, we hope that we will be able to use neural for repair—for example for diseases such as cognitive aging, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, or major depression," says Jessberger.
More information: G.-A. Pilz el al., "Live imaging of neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus," Science (2018). science.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi … 1126/science.aao5056

No comments:

Post a Comment