Deans' stroke musings

Changing stroke rehab and research worldwide now.Time is Brain!Just think of all the trillions and trillions of neurons that DIE each day because there are NO effective hyperacute therapies besides tPA(only 12% effective). I have 493 posts on hyperacute therapy, enough for researchers to spend decades proving them out. These are my personal ideas and blog on stroke rehabilitation and stroke research. Do not attempt any of these without checking with your medical provider. Unless you join me in agitating, when you need these therapies they won't be there.

What this blog is for:

Shortly after getting out of the hospital and getting NO information on the process or protocols of stroke rehabilitation and recovery I started searching on the internet and found that no other survivor received useful information. This is an attempt to cover all stroke rehabilitation information that should be readily available to survivors so they can talk with informed knowledge to their medical staff. It's quite disgusting that this information is not available from every stroke association and doctors group.
My back ground story is here:http://oc1dean.blogspot.com/2010/11/my-background-story_8.html

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Study evaluates women's risk for angina, stroke based on duration of reproductive years

A new study has shown that every 1 year increase in reproductive duration-years from menarche to menopause-was associated with a 3% reduction in a woman's risk of angina or stroke. These results, demonstrated in women 60 years of age and older, support a protective role for estrogen, as reported in an article in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until July 28, 2017.
Coauthors Hend Mansoor, PharmD, Islam Elgendy, MD, Richard Segal, PhD, and Abraham Hartzema, PhD, University of Florida, Gainesville, present their findings in the article entitled "Duration of Reproductive Years and the Risk of Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Events in Older Women: Insights from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." The researchers compared cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events among women divided into two groups, longer reproductive duration (<30 years from beginning to end of menstruation) and shorter reproduction duration (<30 years), performing subgroup analysis for 5-year increments in the longer duration group.

"By evaluating women's risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events based on the duration of their reproductive years, rather than just their age at menarche or their age at menopause as individual variables, Mansoor et al. take into account the effect of cumulative exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health.

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